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Your Representative’s Courage Score

STATE Assembly

(DISTRICT 29)
A+

MARK STONE (D)

COURAGE SCORE: 0
2016
  • 2015

CONTACT ASM MARK STONE

    Thank you for being a progressive champion for the people and standing up for the needs of your constituents over corporate interests. California deserves more leaders like you. You’re a rock star!

    NOTE: Although you may be disappointed with your representative, please be respectful. Use this opportunity to offer constructive feedback. Please abstain from negative, disparaging language, including, but not limited to: expletives, comments about race, gender identity, sexual orientation, ethnicity or religion, and anything specific to appearance.

    VOTING RECORD

    27
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    • YES

      AB 67 (2016 - 1)

      Grants fair pay for workers on Thanksgiving

      1.27.16

      (Gonzalez) Floor: 43-32-4

       

      A 2016 survey found that, due to work obligations, a quarter of Americans would not be able to spend Thanksgiving with their families. AB67 would have fairly compensated any employee who works on Thanksgiving by paying them double for the sacrifices they made to work.

       

      (co-authors: Allen, Calderon, Chu, McCarty)

    • YES

      AB 67 (2016 - 3)

      Grants fair pay for workers on Thanksgiving

      8.31.16

      (Gonzalez) Floor: 31-37-12

       

      A 2016 survey found that, due to work obligations, a quarter of Americans would not be able to spend Thanksgiving with their families. AB67 would have fairly compensated any employee who works on Thanksgiving by paying them double for the sacrifices they made to work.

       

      (co-authors: Allen, Calderon, Chu, McCarty)

    • YES

      AB 197 (2016 - 2)

      Forms committee to reduce local carbon emissions

      8.24.16

      (Garcia) Floor: 45-30-5

       

      Studies have found that certain areas of California have the deadliest air quality in the United States. AB197 provides more assistance for poor, frontline communities that live in this pollution by creating a legislative committee to help meet California’s climate change policies and goals. The committee gains more authority over the California Air Resources Board (CARB), whose primary goal is “to provide safe, clean air to all Californians”, to ensure that emissions are reduced on a state and local level.

       

      (co-authors: Gomez, Rendon)

    • YES

      AB 708 (2016 - 1)

      Mandates disclosure of ingredients in household cleaning products

      1.28.16

      (Jones-Sawyer) Floor: 33-28-18

       

      Many common household cleaning products contain toxins that can cause serious health challenges. This disproportionately affects housekeepers, 90 percent of whom are women and most of whom are women of color. AB708 would have required companies to disclose all ingredients of these products, helping consumers and workers protect themselves from unsafe chemicals.

       

      (co-authors: Leno, McCarty, Pavley)

    • YES

      AB 709 (2016 - 2)

      Requires more accountability from charter schools

      8.24.16

      (Gipson) Floor: 46-31-3

       

      California has the highest number of charter schools in the country, with about 9% of the student population enrolled in these schools. Despite the growth of charter schools, they have proven to be incompetent and inefficient stewards of taxpayer money. State authorities have found that $80M in public dollars has been wastefully spent by some of these schools. AB709 would have required that charter schools be transparent about how taxpayer money is spent, and mandated that they follow the same state laws as public schools. The bill was vetoed by the Governor.

       

      (co-author: Medina)

    • NO

      AB 1066 (2016 - 2)*

      Ensures fair overtime pay for farm workers

      8.29.16

      (Gonzalez) Floor: 30-47-3

       

      This particular vote was a Republican play to move the bill back to the Senate and potentially kill the legislation. A ‘no’ vote meant that legislator was voting to keep the bill in the Assembly where it could be passed and sent to the Governor’s desk.

       

      For almost 100 years, California farm workers have been treated as second-class citizens. Farm laborers grow and harvest food — often working up to 60 hours a week — that feeds nearly half of our nation. But under previous anti-immigrant laws, they were only paid overtime after ten hours of work a day. AB1066 (originally AB2757) gives farm workers fair overtime pay after eight hours of work a day. Passing AB1066 was a challenging effort, with the agriculture industry trying to kill it every step of the way. However, AB1066 was successful and is a step in the right direction, mandating fair compensation in the agricultural industry that falls in line with almost all other professions.

       

      (other lead authors: Bonta, C. Garcia, Hernández, Jones-Sawyer, McCarty, Thurmond; co-authors: Hall, Allen, Block, Chiu, Chu, Gatto, Lopez, Medina, Mitchell, Monning, M. Stone, Ting, Weber)

    • YES

      AB 1066 (2016 - 3)

      Ensures fair overtime pay for farm workers

      8.29.16

      (Gonzalez) Floor: 44-32-4

       

      For almost 100 years, California farm workers have been treated as second-class citizens. Farm laborers grow and harvest food — often working up to 60 hours a week — that feeds nearly half of our nation. But under previous anti-immigrant laws, they were only paid overtime after ten hours of work a day. AB1066 (originally AB2757) gives farm workers fair overtime pay after eight hours of work a day. Passing AB1066 was a challenging effort, with the agriculture industry trying to kill it every step of the way. However, AB1066 was successful and is a step in the right direction, mandating fair compensation in the agricultural industry that falls in line with almost all other professions.

       

      (other lead authors: Bonta, C. Garcia, Hernández, Jones-Sawyer, McCarty, Thurmond; co-authors: Hall, Allen, Block, Chiu, Chu, Gatto, Lopez, Medina, Mitchell, Monning, M. Stone, Ting, Weber)

    • YES

      AB 1676 (2016 - 1)

      Mandates equal pay for women and all races and ethnicities

      6.2.16

      (Campos & Jackson) Labor & Employment: 4-2-1
      (Campos & Jackson) Floor: 47-29-4

       

      According to the 2014 U.S. Census, women average 79 cents of income for every dollar earned by men. Additionally, in 2015, black households had 94% less wealth than white families, while Latinos had 92% less. The California Fair Pay Act – put in place in 2015 – took a step toward fighting this disparity by requiring that women be paid as much as men for similar work. AB1676 expands on this by stating that salary history is not justification for paying women less. The bill also mandates equal pay for employees of different races or ethnicities, making this bill incredibly important for millions of people of color and their families.

       

      (other lead author: Gonzalez; co-authors: Bonilla, Chiu, E. Garcia, C. Garcia, Liu)

    • YES

      AB 2298 (2016 - 1)

      Allows adults to change their status in gang databases

      6.2.16

      (Weber) Floor: 42-34-4

       

      No proof was necessary to include people in CalGang — a database that holds information on individuals who may or may not be connected to a gang in California. Over 150,000 people — mostly Latinos and blacks — are currently listed in CalGang. Many of them are also affected by gang injunctions because of their inclusion in CalGang, which essentially puts suspected gang members on parole without their consent by barring them from wearing gang-related clothing or gathering in certain areas. Authorities were not required to notify people when they were added to this database, but AB2298 gave them the right to know and, then, to appeal the decision. AB2298 increases transparency from law enforcement and continues the fight for racial and criminal justice.

       

      (co-authors: Leno, Mitchell)

    • YES

      AB 2298 (2016 - 2)

      Allows adults to change their status in gang databases

      8.29.16

      (Weber) Floor: 42-29-9

       

      No proof was necessary to include people in CalGang — a database that holds information on individuals who may or may not be connected to a gang in California. Over 150,000 people — mostly Latinos and blacks — are currently listed in CalGang. Many of them are also affected by gang injunctions because of their inclusion in CalGang, which essentially puts suspected gang members on parole without their consent by barring them from wearing gang-related clothing or gathering in certain areas. Authorities were not required to notify people when they were added to this database, but AB2298 gave them the right to know and, then, to appeal the decision. AB2298 increases transparency from law enforcement and continues the fight for racial and criminal justice.

       

      (co-authors: Leno, Mitchell)

    • YES

      AB 2466 (2016 - 1)

      Gives voting rights to low-level felons

      5.31.16

      (Weber) Floor: 41-37-2

       

      Allowing low-level, nonviolent felons to vote reduces the number of people that return to jail, because it provides these people with a meaningful role in society as they begin the reintegration process. Under the California Constitution, those who are currently in prison or on parole for a felony are not allowed to vote. However, in 2011, a new law was enacted to help reduce overcrowding in prisons. Some people convicted of low-level felonies may now, because of this new law, be serving sentences in county jails, under mandatory supervision, or under post-release community supervision. AB2466 gives these individuals the right to vote, helping to end voting discrimination. As three out of four men in California prison are men of color, this bill not only expands the rights of nonviolent felons but also those of people of color.

       

      (co-authors: Mitchell, Gonzalez)

    • YES

      AB 2667 (2016 - 1)

      Bans forced arbitration on consumer & employee contracts

      5.31.16

      (Thurmond) Floor: 38-36-6

       

      Arbitration is the practice of resolving legal disputes outside the courts, often by placing judgments in the hands of employment attorneys or retired judges. Currently, businesses can require consumers to sign agreements wherein, when consumers purchase products like cell phones, vehicles or bank accounts, they are forced to relinquish their rights to judicial process should harm come to them while using these products. Many of the ‘agreements’ force consumers to waive their right to class action lawsuits, and arbiters overwhelmingly tend to render judgments in favor of companies, and against consumers. To make matters worse, often companies intentionally obfuscate the nature of these agreements so consumers have no idea what they are signing.

      While this may sound like standard legal maneuvering, make no mistake — this is a civil rights issue. A federal judge in Boston called forced arbitration an attempt by businesses to “opt out of the legal system altogether.” This is exactly what happened when Sprint, a company with 57 million subscribers, allegedly overbilled customers — James Pendergast from Miami was just one consumer who was not allowed to bring a class action suit against the company because of the coerced forced arbitration document he had signed upon purchasing his phone. It is no mystery why big corporations use this tactic — a study by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau found that victims without forced arbitration clauses earn three times as much in damages when suing big businesses as those who do.

      Forced arbitration is, in short, a corporate bullying tactic used by Big Business to evade accountability. When this is allowed, we are all more at risk. AB2667 would have chipped away at this unjust practice by making it illegal for businesses to make these waivers a mandatory condition of entering into a contract.

       

      (co-authors: Bonta, M. Stone, Weber)

    • YES

      AB 2748 (2016 - 1)

      Helps those affected by environmental disasters

      5.5.16

      (Gatto) Floor: 30-32-18
      (Gatto) Judiciary: 4-2-1

      The Aliso Canyon gas leak in October 2015 was the worst single gas leak in US history and directly affected thousands of families in northern Los Angeles County. AB2748 would have ensured that victims who win payouts in environmental disasters (for example, assistance with food and shelter) would not lose their rights to bring forth legal challenges in the future if more complications arose related to the disaster. AB2748 would have ensured that citizens have the opportunity to hold companies accountable for environmental disasters. It was vetoed by the Governor.

    • YES

      AB 2757 (2016 - 1)

      Ensures fair overtime pay for farm workers

      6.2.16

      (Gonzalez) Floor: 45-28-7

       

      For almost 100 years, California farm workers have been treated as second-class citizens. Farm laborers grow and harvest food — often working up to 60 hours a week — that feeds nearly half of our nation. But under previous anti-immigrant laws, they were only paid overtime after ten hours of work a day. AB1066 (originally AB2757) gives farm workers fair overtime pay after eight hours of work a day. Passing AB1066 was a challenging effort, with the agriculture industry trying to kill it every step of the way. However, AB1066 was successful and is a step in the right direction, mandating fair compensation in the agricultural industry that falls in line with almost all other professions.

       

      (other lead authors: Bonta, C. Garcia, Hernández; co-authors: Hall, Allen, Beall, Block, Burke, Calderon, Campos, Chiu, Chu, Gipson, Hancock, Jones-Sawyer, Lara, Leno, Liu, Lopez, McCarty, Medina, Mitchell, Santiago, M. Stone, Thurmond, Ting)

    • YES

      AB 2757 (2016 - 2)

      Ensures fair overtime pay for farm workers

      6.2.16

      (Gonzalez) Floor: 38-35-7

       

      For almost 100 years, California farm workers have been treated as second-class citizens. Farm laborers grow and harvest food — often working up to 60 hours a week — that feeds nearly half of our nation. But under previous anti-immigrant laws, they were only paid overtime after ten hours of work a day. AB1066 (originally AB2757) gives farm workers fair overtime pay after eight hours of work a day. Passing AB1066 was a challenging effort, with the agriculture industry trying to kill it every step of the way. However, AB1066 was successful and is a step in the right direction, mandating fair compensation in the agricultural industry that falls in line with almost all other professions.

       

      (other lead authors: Bonta, C. Garcia, Hernández; co-authors: Hall, Allen, Beall, Block, Burke, Calderon, Campos, Chiu, Chu, Gipson, Hancock, Jones-Sawyer, Lara, Leno, Liu, Lopez, McCarty, Medina, Mitchell, Santiago, M. Stone, Thurmond, Ting)

    • YES

      AB 2792 (2016 - 1)

      Protects immigrants from immigration officials

      5.23.16

      (Bonta) Floor: 44-29-7

       

      Almost 250,000 immigrants were deported last year, tearing apart families across the nation. The TRUTH Act (AB2792) helps keep families together by giving immigrants in jail clear rights to protect them from Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) officials and possible deportation. While in custody, they are now required to receive notice that ICE officials would like to interview them, and they are given the option to decline. If law enforcement provides ICE with information about the individual’s release, the information is also given to the individual. Deportations of immigrants affect not only the individual, but also families and entire communities. The TRUTH Act recognizes this and advocates for the preservation of California’s families.

       

      (co-authors: Alejo, Leno, Lopez)

    • YES

      AB 2792 (2016 - 2)

      Protects immigrants from immigration officials

      8.30.16

      (Bonta) Floor: 46-29-5

       

      Almost 250,000 immigrants were deported last year, tearing apart families across the nation. The TRUTH Act (AB2792) helps keep families together by giving immigrants in jail clear rights to protect them from Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) officials and possible deportation. While in custody, they are now required to receive notice that ICE officials would like to interview them, and they are given the option to decline. If law enforcement provides ICE with information about the individual’s release, the information is also given to the individual. Deportations of immigrants affect not only the individual, but also families and entire communities. The TRUTH Act recognizes this and advocates for the preservation of California’s families.

       

      (co-authors: Alejo, Leno, Lopez)

    • YES

      AB 2819 (2016 - 1)

      Helps dependable renters avoid inaccurate eviction lists

      5.16.16

      (Chiu) Floor: 41-30-9

      Before passage of AB2819, renters throughout California were being denied housing due to lawsuits with their previous landlords — leading some families to even become homeless. Tenants were added to public “blacklists” if their landlord took them to court. Despite the fact that many renters were never even evicted, they were added to a list that led potential landlords to deny their future applications for housing. AB2819 protects innocent tenants by requiring that this information only be made public if the tenant is actually evicted. This helps to ensure that the list accurately reflects rental histories.

    • YES

      AB 2895 (2016 - 1)

      Requires employers to have injury prevention programs

      6.2.16

      (Hernandez) Floor: 44-30-6

      Over 460,000 California workers obtained an injury or illness while on the job in 2014. AB2895 would have forced all employers in California to create and maintain an injury prevention program to protect their workers. At worksites with three or more employees, employers would have been required to inform employees of the program or be taken to court.

    • YES

      SB 10 (2016 - 1)

      Increases health insurance options for undocumented immigrants

      5.31.16

      (Lara) Floor: 55-20-5

       

      As of 2014, about 2.4 million people living in California were undocumented immigrants. However, under the Affordable Care Act, these immigrants were not able to purchase their own health insurance, leaving millions to suffer without proper, timely treatment due to excessive health care costs. SB10 increases health insurance options for all by allowing undocumented immigrants to be insured through Covered California, and expands Medi-Cal to low-income undocumented adults.

       

      (co-authors: Bonta, Chiu, Gonzalez, Roger Hernández, Santiago, Thurmond, Wood)

    • YES

      SB 32 (2016 - 1)

      Sets climate pollution reduction target for 2030

      8.19.16

      (Pavley) Floor: 44-21-15

       

      California is home to six of the ten most polluted cities in the country. Reducing emissions would drastically improve the health of our state and make us climate leaders for the nation. SB32 reduces greenhouse gases by requiring emissions to drop 40% from 1990 levels by 2030. SB32 is known colloquially as the child of AB32, California’s signature climate change law, passed in 2006, that required the Air Resources Board, by 2020, to formulate a plan that would bring greenhouse gas emissions down to 1990 levels.

       

      (other lead author: E. Garcia; co-authors: Allen, Atkins, Beall, Block, Bloom, Chau, Chiu, Chu, De León, C. Garcia, Hancock, Hill, Jackson, Jones-Sawyer, Leno, Liu, McCarty, McGuire, Mitchell, Monning, Quirk, Rendon, M. Stone, Thurmond, Ting, Wieckowski, Williams, Wolk, Wood)

    • YES

      SB 322 (2016 - 1)

      Prevents discrimination in charter schools

      8.30.16

      (Leno) Floor: 31-34-15

      The ACLU recently found that more than 20% of charter schools in California have denied access to students with disabilities, those with lower grades, and English learners, despite the fact that state law requires these schools to accept all students. SB322 would have ensured that charter schools do not discriminate in their admission, suspension, and expulsion policies, and would have given students and their families due process.

    • YES

      SB 759 (2016 - 1)

      Allows early release for prisoners in solitary confinement

      8.4.16

      (Anderson) Appropriations: 12-6-2
      (Anderson) Floor: 41-31-8

       

      California has one of the harshest solitary confinement laws in the country, leading prisoners in Security Housing Units (SHUs) to be confined for an average of six years in a 2-by-10 foot cell. SB759 allows prisoners in SHUs to earn credits for early release by displaying good behavior, and by participating in rehabilitation programs. Solitary confinement is recognized by the United Nations as a form of torture, and SB759 is one step toward righting this practice.

       

      (other lead author: Hancock; co-authors: Jones-Sawyer, Leno, Liu, Mitchell, Quirk)

    • YES

      SB 1000 (2016 - 2)

      Demands a focus on environmental issues in poor areas

      8.31.16

      (Leyva) Floor: 47-28-5

       

      Every city and county in California must create a General Plan on how their land will be utilized. However, poor communities are often overlooked, leading to disproportionate services such as lacking commercial development and new housing options. The Planning for Healthy Communities Act (SB1000) requires that all cities and counties intentionally identify disadvantaged areas and work toward the reduction of environment-related issues and health risks. It also encourages individuals within those communities to become involved in the decision-making process, providing not only necessary services, but also empowerment.

       

      (co-author: Medina)

    • YES

      SB 1107 (2016 - 2)

      Allows new options for election campaign funding

      8.30.16

      (Allen) Floor: 55-22-3

       

      In a step toward getting big money out of politics, SB1107 overturned 30-year old law that banned citizen-funded campaigning. SB1107 allows locals to decide if they would like to enact citizen-funded campaigning. Cities across the nation that already allow these practices have found greater diversity in candidates, less pull from special interest groups, and a reduction in pressure for candidates to fundraise to support their campaigns.

       

      (co-authors: Chiu, Hancock, Gonzalez)

    • YES

      SB 1129 (2016 - 1)

      Eliminates criminal sentences for prostituted minors

      8.18.16

      (Monning) Floor: 41-29-10

      According to the National Human Trafficking Hotline, there were over 1,000 reported cases of sex trafficking in California last year. Prior to the passing of SB 1129, prostituted minors were charged with minimum sentences despite the fact that many of them were victims of sex trafficking. SB 1129 showcases California’s recent focus on preventing sex trafficking throughout the state, safeguarding children who have been forced into the industry from further injustices.

    • YES

      SB 1263 (2016 - 1)

      Strengthens regulations to increase clean water access

      8.18.16

      (Wieckowski) Environmental Quality: 4-2-1
      (Wieckowski) Floor: 39-30-11

       

      Due to limited resources, small water companies often do not provide water that meets quality regulations. SB1263 bans these companies from operating if the proposed service area already has access to quality-tested and sustainable public water systems. This helps to ensure that all Californians have access to safe, clean water.

       

      (other lead author: Pavley)

    • YES

      SB 1322 (2016 - 1)

      Decriminalizes prostitution for minors

      8.18.16

      (Mitchell) Public Safety: 4-3-0
      (Mitchell) Floor: 42-29-9

       

      Victims of sex trafficking are often treated as criminals by law enforcement. SB1322 helps to protect them by decriminalizing prostitution for minors. Under SB1322, law enforcement officials are permitted to take the children into temporary custody, but only if necessary for their safety. Each incident must be reported to a child welfare agency, and any person engaging in sex acts with minors will be arrested. But rather than punishing the children, SB1322 takes steps to ensure potential sex trafficking victims are shielded from unnecessary criminal histories.

       

      (co-authors: C. Garcia, Lackey, Wieckowski)

    • N/E

      AB 1676 (2016 - 1)

      Mandates equal pay for women and all races and ethnicities

      4.20.16

      (Campos & Jackson) Labor & Employment: 4-2-1
      (Campos & Jackson) Floor: 47-29-4

       

      According to the 2014 U.S. Census, women average 79 cents of income for every dollar earned by men. Additionally, in 2015, black households had 94% less wealth than white families, while Latinos had 92% less. The California Fair Pay Act – put in place in 2015 – took a step toward fighting this disparity by requiring that women be paid as much as men for similar work. AB1676 expands on this by stating that salary history is not justification for paying women less. The bill also mandates equal pay for employees of different races or ethnicities, making this bill incredibly important for millions of people of color and their families.

       

      (other lead author: Gonzalez; co-authors: Bonilla, Chiu, E. Garcia, C. Garcia, Liu)

    • N/E

      AB 1732 (2016 - 1)

      Requires single-occupancy restrooms to be open to all genders

      4.20.16

      (Ting) Appropriations: 11-4-5

       

      A 2013 survey found that 70% of respondents identifying as transgender or non-conforming gender had been harassed or assaulted in public restrooms. Gender-specific restrooms leave many populations in a position where they either have to break social norms or be put in an uncomfortable and potentially dangerous situation. The passing of AB1732 — the first of its kind in the nation — requires that single-occupancy restrooms have gender-neutral signs to announce they are open for everyone’s use, regardless of gender identification. These new signs will remove the stigma that many people face each and every day when using public restrooms.

       

      (co-authors: Chiu, Eggman, Leno)

    • N/E

      AB 1948 (2016 - 1)*

      Reduces employer penalties for missed employee breaks

      4.20.16

      (Wagner) Labor & Employment: 1-4-2

      Breaks at work are vital to the health and safety of employees. Right now, employers must provide their employees with fair and necessary meal or rest periods, and if they fail to do so, employers are required to pay the worker an additional hour for every skipped break. AB1948 would have let employers off the hook by allowing them to deny employees breaks as long as they pay the penalty. It would also have prohibited the employees from requesting any criminal or civil punishment for their employers.

    • N/E

      AB 2502 (2016 - 1)

      Increases the number of affordable housing units

      4.13.16

      (Mullin & Chiu) Local Government: 5-3-1

      California is facing a historic housing crisis. Due to soaring housing costs, more and more families are being forced to leave their homes. Foreclosures and raised rents leave many with few options for safe, affordable housing. AB2502 would have given more housing options to those living in poverty by requiring that all new housing developments include a certain number of affordable units for low-income households. This bill would have helped working families find better housing while also creating thriving, more diverse neighborhoods for all.

       

      (co-authors: Bonilla, Burke, Campos, Gordon, Leno, Thurmond, Ting, Wieckowski)

    • N/E

      AB 2729 (2016 - 1)

      Requires operators to close long-term idle oil and gas wells

      4.12.16

      (Williams & Thurmond) Environmental Safety & Toxic Materials: 4-3-0

       

      Thousands of oil and natural gas wells across California have been sitting idle for years but have not been permanently sealed. These wells are often ignored and left for years without maintenance, an oversight which can be hazardous to both the environment and public health. AB 2729 requires well operators to conduct ongoing monitoring and to begin the process of sealing long-term idle wells.

       

      (other lead author: Salas)

    • N/E

      AB 2729 (2016 - 2)

      Requires operators to close long-term idle oil and gas wells

      5.27.16

      (Williams & Thurmond) Appropriations: 12-6-2

       

      Thousands of oil and natural gas wells across California have been sitting idle for years but have not been permanently sealed. These wells are often ignored and left for years without maintenance, an oversight which can be hazardous to both the environment and public health. AB 2729 requires well operators to conduct ongoing monitoring and to begin the process of sealing long-term idle wells.

       

      (other lead author: Salas)

    • N/E

      SB 654 (2016 - 1)

      Increases length of parental leave

      8.22.16

      (Jackson) Labor & Employment: 4-2-1

       

      Although California is one of the few states to provide partial paid parental leave, we are still far behind developed nations throughout the world in terms of allowing new parents paid, relaxing time to spend with their newborn children. SB 654 and SB 1166 aimed to extend these rights in California. SB 1166 would have required employers with at least 10 employees to allow them 12 weeks of parental leave. SB 654 was created after the failure of SB 1166; it increased the employee threshold to 20 and mandated 6 weeks of parental leave, but was ultimately vetoed by Governor Brown.

       

      (co-authors: Atkins, Bonilla, Burke, Campos, C. Garcia, Gonzalez, Hancock, Leyva, Lopez, Wolk)

    • N/E

      SB 654 (2016 - 2)

      Increases length of parental leave

      8.29.16

      (Jackson) Appropriations: 12-5-3
      (Jackson) Floor: 24-12-3

       

      Although California is one of the few states to provide partial paid parental leave, we are still far behind developed nations throughout the world in terms of allowing new parents paid, relaxing time to spend with their newborn children. SB 654 and SB 1166 aimed to extend these rights in California. SB 1166 would have required employers with at least 10 employees to allow them 12 weeks of parental leave. SB 654 was created after the failure of SB 1166; it increased the employee threshold to 20 and mandated 6 weeks of parental leave, but was ultimately vetoed by Governor Brown.

       

      (co-authors: Atkins, Bonilla, Burke, Campos, C. Garcia, Gonzalez, Hancock, Leyva, Lopez, Wolk)

    • N/E

      SB 759 (2016 - 1)

      Allows early release for prisoners in solitary confinement

      6.29.16

      (Anderson) Appropriations: 12-6-2
      (Anderson) Floor: 41-31-8

       

      California has one of the harshest solitary confinement laws in the country, leading prisoners in Security Housing Units (SHUs) to be confined for an average of six years in a 2-by-10 foot cell. SB759 allows prisoners in SHUs to earn credits for early release by displaying good behavior, and by participating in rehabilitation programs. Solitary confinement is recognized by the United Nations as a form of torture, and SB759 is one step toward righting this practice.

       

      (other lead author: Hancock; co-authors: Jones-Sawyer, Leno, Liu, Mitchell, Quirk)

    • N/E

      SB 966 (2016 - 2)

      Removes additional jail time for prior drug convictions

      6.28.16

      (Mitchell) Floor: 22-14-4
      (Mitchell) Public Safety: 3-2-2

       

      When drug offenders are convicted of an offense, they currently are up against laws that require an additional three year sentence for every prior drug conviction. This law was created to lessen drug use and sales, despite no evidence that it would actually accomplish that goal. Instead, it has been harshly used, mostly against blacks and Latinos while ruining their chances of rehabilitation and integration back into society. The Repeal Ineffective Sentencing Enhancement (RISE) Act (SB966) would have eliminated these sentencing enhancements. Had it passed, more resources would have been available to help create positive, lasting results for these individuals, rather than forcing communities to pay for unnecessary jail time.

       

      (co-authors: Leno, Wieckowski)

    • N/E

      SB 1010 (2016 - 1)

      Increases transparency in prescription drug prices

      8.11.16

      (Hernandez) Appropriations: 12-0-8

       

      The skyrocketing prices of life-saving prescription drugs (such as EpiPens, that increased in price almost 125% between 2007 and 2014) are hurting patients that need them. In 2013, households across the United States were spending about $858 per person on prescriptions – almost double the cost of many other developed nations. SB1010 would have required prescription drug manufacturers to give notice of price increases to health insurers and pharmacies. Manufacturers also would have needed to provide reports on how the costs of these drugs were affecting patient premiums. Unfortunately, thirty Big Pharma companies spent millions on corporate lobbyists and successfully killed this modest bill.

       

      (co-author: Chiu)

    • N/E

      SB 1166 (2016 - 2)

      Increases length of parental leave

      6.22.16

      (Jackson) Labor & Employment: 2-1-4

       

      Although California is one of the few states to provide partial paid parental leave, we are still far behind developed nations throughout the world in terms of allowing new parents paid, relaxing time to spend with their newborn children. SB 654 and SB 1166 aimed to extend these rights in California. SB 1166 would have required employers with at least 10 employees to allow them 12 weeks of parental leave. SB 654 was created after the failure of SB 1166; it increased the employee threshold to 20 and mandated 6 weeks of parental leave, but was ultimately vetoed by Governor Brown.

       

      (co-authors: Bonilla, Campos, C. Garcia, Gonzalez, Lopez)

    • A
      =

      Chose not to cast a yes/no ballot

      N/E
      =

      Not Eligible to cast yes/no ballot due to committee assignments

      * Courage Campaign supported a position of NO on this vote.