calculating courage score
SHARE THIS SITE

Your Representative’s Courage Score

STATE Senate

(DISTRICT 7)
F

STEVE GLAZER (D)

COURAGE SCORE: 0
2016
  • 2015

Glazer won his seat in 2015 with the help of millions of dollars of support from conservative mega-donor Bill Bloomfield, the California Real Estate industry, and other ultra-wealthy corporate types, among them the CEO of Netflix and the co-founder of The Gap.

In 2016, Glazer once again earned his place in our Hall of Shame by voting TWICE against bills to expand CA’s successful paid family leave program (SB 654 and SB 1166). He objected to retail workers receiving extra compensation if they were forced to leave their families on Thanksgiving (AB 67). He even refused to help educate the public about poisons in household cleaning products (AB 708), leaving us all vulnerable to cancer causing chemicals. Glazer repeatedly sides against workers on behalf of big business and corporate profits.

On housing issues, Sen. Glazer was also a failure. He voted to stop protections for widows and widowers at risk of losing their homes simply because their mortgage was in their spouse’s name (SB 1150), and he objected to common sense protections against abusive landlords (AB 2819). Is it any wonder, with the real estate industry as one of his key campaign donors, that Glazer consistently sides with greedy landlords out to exploit their tenants?

Sen. Glazer also stands on the wrong side of racial justice issues. He opposed farmworkers receiving the same overtime pay hikes that nearly all other professions receive, a disparity that mostly impacts workers of color (AB 1066), and helped water down a critical bill to reform the War on Drugs (AB 966), which would have eliminated sentencing “enhancements” that mostly target blacks and Latinos. Glazer’s approach to racial justice is dangerously regressive.

Last but certainly not least, Sen. Glazer was no friend to the environment or anyone who breathes air or drinks water — particularly poor people and people of color. He tried to block SB 1000, which required cities to take environmental health risks into account during planning, particularly in poorer communities. He opposed improving access to clean, safe water in poor communities (SB 1318) and opposed increasing the voice of environmental justice groups in policy decisions impacting air quality in Southern California (SB 1387). Steve Glazer’s votes on public health and the environment put the health of the people of California at risk.

There are many conservative Assemblymembers in the California Legislature with terrible Courage Scores, so what makes Sen. Glazer’s voting record so egregious? He is grotesquely out of touch with the values of his district. Voters in his East Bay district have repeatedly shown progressive values in votes on statewide ballot measures. They stand for many of the policies Sen. Glazer opposes. In 2012, they voted to raise taxes on the wealthy to fund schools (56% on Prop 30) and they extended those taxes in 2016 (60% on Prop 55). On environmental issues, they voted to ban plastic bags (56% on Prop 67 in 2016) and to improve energy efficiency and expand clean energy in schools (63% on Prop 39 in 2012). Sen. Glazer’s district also believes in reforming the racist, wasteful War on Drugs. It voted overwhelmingly in favor of repealing California’s Three Strikes Law (69% on Prop 36 in 2012), and firmly supported reducing non-violent felonies to misdemeanors (63% on Prop. 47 in 2014) and reforming CA’s broken parole and juvenile trial system (66% on Prop 57 in 2016).

The voters in Glazer’s district repeatedly demonstrate progressive values and Sen. Steve Glazer repeatedly lets them down. This is shameful. His constituents deserve better.

CONTACT SEN STEVE GLAZER

    I am horrified by the way some legislators value corporate priorities and profits above the well being of everyday Californians. Based on what I’ve seen on The People’s Report Card of California, I think you are part of the problem. I respectfully ask you to stand up to these moneyed interests and demonstrate courage by representing your constituents.

    NOTE: Although you may be disappointed with your representative, please be respectful. Use this opportunity to offer constructive feedback. Please abstain from negative, disparaging language, including, but not limited to: expletives, comments about race, gender identity, sexual orientation, ethnicity or religion, and anything specific to appearance.

    VOTING RECORD

    129
    FILTER BY TOPIC
    ALL BILLS
    • ALL BILLS
    • Consumer Protection
    • Criminal Justice
    • Economic Justice
    • Education
    • Environmental Justice
    • Environmental Protection
    • Gender Equality
    • Health
    • Housing
    • Immigration
    • LGBTQ Rights
    • Racial Justice
    • Voting Rights
    • Worker's Rights
    • NO

      AB 67 (2016 - 2)

      Grants fair pay for workers on Thanksgiving

      8.29.16

      (Gonzalez) Floor: 22-14-3

       

      A 2016 survey found that, due to work obligations, a quarter of Americans would not be able to spend Thanksgiving with their families. AB67 would have fairly compensated any employee who works on Thanksgiving by paying them double for the sacrifices they made to work.

       

      (co-authors: Allen, Calderon, Chu, McCarty)

    • YES

      AB 197 (2016 - 1)

      Forms committee to reduce local carbon emissions

      8.22.16

      (Garcia) Floor: 23-13-3

       

      Studies have found that certain areas of California have the deadliest air quality in the United States. AB197 provides more assistance for poor, frontline communities that live in this pollution by creating a legislative committee to help meet California’s climate change policies and goals. The committee gains more authority over the California Air Resources Board (CARB), whose primary goal is “to provide safe, clean air to all Californians”, to ensure that emissions are reduced on a state and local level.

       

      (co-authors: Gomez, Rendon)

    • A

      AB 709 (2016 - 1)

      Requires more accountability from charter schools

      8.19.16

      (Gipson) Floor: 21-13-5

       

      California has the highest number of charter schools in the country, with about 9% of the student population enrolled in these schools. Despite the growth of charter schools, they have proven to be incompetent and inefficient stewards of taxpayer money. State authorities have found that $80M in public dollars has been wastefully spent by some of these schools. AB709 would have required that charter schools be transparent about how taxpayer money is spent, and mandated that they follow the same state laws as public schools. The bill was vetoed by the Governor.

       

      (co-author: Medina)

    • NO

      AB 1066 (2016 - 1)

      Ensures fair overtime pay for farm workers

      8.22.16

      (Gonzalez) Floor: 21-14-4

       

      For almost 100 years, California farm workers have been treated as second-class citizens. Farm laborers grow and harvest food — often working up to 60 hours a week — that feeds nearly half of our nation. But under previous anti-immigrant laws, they were only paid overtime after ten hours of work a day. AB1066 (originally AB2757) gives farm workers fair overtime pay after eight hours of work a day. Passing AB1066 was a challenging effort, with the agriculture industry trying to kill it every step of the way. However, AB1066 was successful and is a step in the right direction, mandating fair compensation in the agricultural industry that falls in line with almost all other professions.

       

      (other lead authors: Bonta, C. Garcia, Hernández, Jones-Sawyer, McCarty, Thurmond; co-authors: Hall, Allen, Block, Chiu, Chu, Gatto, Lopez, Medina, Mitchell, Monning, M. Stone, Ting, Weber)

    • NO

      AB 1690 (2016 - 1)

      Strengthens job security for part-time community college professors

      8.22.16

      (Medina) Education: 5-2-2
      (Medina) Floor: 23-14-2

      Part-time faculty members in community colleges are usually paid per course and need to go through a rehiring process each term. This job insecurity affects a majority of community college professors, since part-time professors make up two-thirds of community college faculty. AB1690 – in conjunction with SB1379 – gives part-time professors the right to negotiate with their employers regarding rules of employment and termination, allowing them to work toward solutions that will give them more stable careers.

    • YES

      AB 2466 (2016 - 2)

      Gives voting rights to low-level felons

      8.16.16

      (Weber) Floor: 23-13-3

       

      Allowing low-level, nonviolent felons to vote reduces the number of people that return to jail, because it provides these people with a meaningful role in society as they begin the reintegration process. Under the California Constitution, those who are currently in prison or on parole for a felony are not allowed to vote. However, in 2011, a new law was enacted to help reduce overcrowding in prisons. Some people convicted of low-level felonies may now, because of this new law, be serving sentences in county jails, under mandatory supervision, or under post-release community supervision. AB2466 gives these individuals the right to vote, helping to end voting discrimination. As three out of four men in California prison are men of color, this bill not only expands the rights of nonviolent felons but also those of people of color.

       

      (co-authors: Mitchell, Gonzalez)

    • YES

      AB 2748 (2016 - 2)

      Helps those affected by environmental disasters

      8.23.16

      (Gatto) Floor: 23-13-3

      The Aliso Canyon gas leak in October 2015 was the worst single gas leak in US history and directly affected thousands of families in northern Los Angeles County. AB2748 would have ensured that victims who win payouts in environmental disasters (for example, assistance with food and shelter) would not lose their rights to bring forth legal challenges in the future if more complications arose related to the disaster. AB2748 would have ensured that citizens have the opportunity to hold companies accountable for environmental disasters. It was vetoed by the Governor.

    • A

      AB 2819 (2016 - 2)

      Helps dependable renters avoid inaccurate eviction lists

      8.15.16

      (Chiu) Floor: 21-11-7

      Before passage of AB2819, renters throughout California were being denied housing due to lawsuits with their previous landlords — leading some families to even become homeless. Tenants were added to public “blacklists” if their landlord took them to court. Despite the fact that many renters were never even evicted, they were added to a list that led potential landlords to deny their future applications for housing. AB2819 protects innocent tenants by requiring that this information only be made public if the tenant is actually evicted. This helps to ensure that the list accurately reflects rental histories.

    • YES

      SB 10 (2016 - 2)

      Increases health insurance options for undocumented immigrants

      6.2.16

      (Lara) Floor: 28-10-2

       

      As of 2014, about 2.4 million people living in California were undocumented immigrants. However, under the Affordable Care Act, these immigrants were not able to purchase their own health insurance, leaving millions to suffer without proper, timely treatment due to excessive health care costs. SB10 increases health insurance options for all by allowing undocumented immigrants to be insured through Covered California, and expands Medi-Cal to low-income undocumented adults.

       

      (co-authors: Bonta, Chiu, Gonzalez, Roger Hernández, Santiago, Thurmond, Wood)

    • YES

      SB 527 (2016 - 1)

      Provides grants to help at-risk students and reduce truancy

      1.26.16

      (Liu) Floor: 24-10-6

       

      In 2015, more than 1 in 5 elementary school students were considered truant (three or more unexcused absences throughout the year) and about 8% of elementary students considered chronically absent. When they miss school, students fall drastically behind in their education. SB527 addresses this crisis by providing grants from the State Department of Education to create programs that help to reduce truancy and support students who are at risk of dropping out of school or the victims of crime.

       

      (co-author: Thurmond)

    • NO

      SB 654 (2016 - 2)

      Increases length of parental leave

      8.31.16

      (Jackson) Appropriations: 12-5-3
      (Jackson) Floor: 24-12-3

       

      Although California is one of the few states to provide partial paid parental leave, we are still far behind developed nations throughout the world in terms of allowing new parents paid, relaxing time to spend with their newborn children. SB 654 and SB 1166 aimed to extend these rights in California. SB 1166 would have required employers with at least 10 employees to allow them 12 weeks of parental leave. SB 654 was created after the failure of SB 1166; it increased the employee threshold to 20 and mandated 6 weeks of parental leave, but was ultimately vetoed by Governor Brown.

       

      (co-authors: Atkins, Bonilla, Burke, Campos, C. Garcia, Gonzalez, Hancock, Leyva, Lopez, Wolk)

    • NO

      SB 899 (2016 - 1)

      Fights the "pink tax"

      5.26.16

      (Hueso) Floor: 22-12-6

       

      A recent study conducted by the NYC Department of Consumer Affairs looked at 800 different products and found that many of those marketed for women or girls cost, on average, 7% more than those marketed for men or boys. Although current laws in California ban gender discrimination on pricing for services, SB899 would have extended that by including products, and would have brought California one step closer to ending gender discrimination.

       

      (co-authors: Gonzalez, Campos, E. Garcia, Hall, Leno, Leyva)

    • NO

      SB 966 (2016 - 1)

      Removes additional jail time for prior drug convictions

      4.25.16

      (Mitchell) Floor: 18-16-6

       

      When drug offenders are convicted of an offense, they currently are up against laws that require an additional three year sentence for every prior drug conviction. This law was created to lessen drug use and sales, despite no evidence that it would actually accomplish that goal. Instead, it has been harshly used, mostly against blacks and Latinos while ruining their chances of rehabilitation and integration back into society. The Repeal Ineffective Sentencing Enhancement (RISE) Act (SB966) would have eliminated these sentencing enhancements. Had it passed, more resources would have been available to help create positive, lasting results for these individuals, rather than forcing communities to pay for unnecessary jail time.

       

      (co-authors: Leno, Wieckowski)

    • YES

      SB 966 (2016 - 2)

      Removes additional jail time for prior drug convictions

      6.2.16

      (Mitchell) Floor: 22-14-4
      (Mitchell) Public Safety: 3-2-2

       

      When drug offenders are convicted of an offense, they currently are up against laws that require an additional three year sentence for every prior drug conviction. This law was created to lessen drug use and sales, despite no evidence that it would actually accomplish that goal. Instead, it has been harshly used, mostly against blacks and Latinos while ruining their chances of rehabilitation and integration back into society. The Repeal Ineffective Sentencing Enhancement (RISE) Act (SB966) would have eliminated these sentencing enhancements. Had it passed, more resources would have been available to help create positive, lasting results for these individuals, rather than forcing communities to pay for unnecessary jail time.

       

      (co-authors: Leno, Wieckowski)

    • NO

      SB 1000 (2016 - 1)

      Demands a focus on environmental issues in poor areas

      6.1.16

      (Leyva) Floor: 24-15-1

       

      Every city and county in California must create a General Plan on how their land will be utilized. However, poor communities are often overlooked, leading to disproportionate services such as lacking commercial development and new housing options. The Planning for Healthy Communities Act (SB1000) requires that all cities and counties intentionally identify disadvantaged areas and work toward the reduction of environment-related issues and health risks. It also encourages individuals within those communities to become involved in the decision-making process, providing not only necessary services, but also empowerment.

       

      (co-author: Medina)

    • YES

      SB 1107 (2016 - 1)

      Allows new options for election campaign funding

      5.31.16

      (Allen) Floor: 26-12-2

       

      In a step toward getting big money out of politics, SB1107 overturned 30-year old law that banned citizen-funded campaigning. SB1107 allows locals to decide if they would like to enact citizen-funded campaigning. Cities across the nation that already allow these practices have found greater diversity in candidates, less pull from special interest groups, and a reduction in pressure for candidates to fundraise to support their campaigns.

       

      (co-authors: Chiu, Hancock, Gonzalez)

    • YES

      SB 1107 (2016 - 3)

      Allows new options for election campaign funding

      8.31.16

      (Allen) Floor: 27-12-0

       

      In a step toward getting big money out of politics, SB1107 overturned 30-year old law that banned citizen-funded campaigning. SB1107 allows locals to decide if they would like to enact citizen-funded campaigning. Cities across the nation that already allow these practices have found greater diversity in candidates, less pull from special interest groups, and a reduction in pressure for candidates to fundraise to support their campaigns.

       

      (co-authors: Chiu, Hancock, Gonzalez)

    • YES

      SB 1129 (2016 - 2)

      Eliminates criminal sentences for prostituted minors

      8.24.16

      (Monning) Floor: 24-14-1

      According to the National Human Trafficking Hotline, there were over 1,000 reported cases of sex trafficking in California last year. Prior to the passing of SB 1129, prostituted minors were charged with minimum sentences despite the fact that many of them were victims of sex trafficking. SB 1129 showcases California’s recent focus on preventing sex trafficking throughout the state, safeguarding children who have been forced into the industry from further injustices.

    • NO

      SB 1150 (2016 - 2)

      Protects people from foreclosure after death of a family member

      5.31.16

      (Leno) Judiciary: 4-1-2
      (Leno) Floor: 18-18-4

       

      After the passing of a family member, widows, widowers, and other heirs who fall behind on mortgage payments struggle to keep their homes. Mortgage servicers often refuse to work with them if they are not listed on the loan, which can lead to foreclosures for many families. SB1150 gives family members the same protections as their recently deceased loved ones — the right to modify loan payments, stop unlawful foreclosures, and sue for any violations. All told, SB1150 has given these families a fair chance to stay in their homes.

       

      (other lead author: Galgiani; co-author: Wieckowski)

    • NO

      SB 1150 (2016 - 3)

      Protects people from foreclosure after death of a family member

      6.1.16

      (Leno) Floor: 21-14-5

       

      After the passing of a family member, widows, widowers, and other heirs who fall behind on mortgage payments struggle to keep their homes. Mortgage servicers often refuse to work with them if they are not listed on the loan, which can lead to foreclosures for many families. SB1150 gives family members the same protections as their recently deceased loved ones — the right to modify loan payments, stop unlawful foreclosures, and sue for any violations. All told, SB1150 has given these families a fair chance to stay in their homes.

       

      (other lead author: Galgiani; co-author: Wieckowski)

    • NO

      SB 1150 (2016 - 4)

      Protects people from foreclosure after death of a family member

      8.24.16

      (Leno) Floor: 22-13-4

       

      After the passing of a family member, widows, widowers, and other heirs who fall behind on mortgage payments struggle to keep their homes. Mortgage servicers often refuse to work with them if they are not listed on the loan, which can lead to foreclosures for many families. SB1150 gives family members the same protections as their recently deceased loved ones — the right to modify loan payments, stop unlawful foreclosures, and sue for any violations. All told, SB1150 has given these families a fair chance to stay in their homes.

       

      (other lead author: Galgiani; co-author: Wieckowski)

    • NO

      SB 1166 (2016 - 1)

      Increases length of parental leave

      6.1.16

      (Jackson) Judiciary: 4-2-1
      (Jackson) Floor: 22-14-4

       

      Although California is one of the few states to provide partial paid parental leave, we are still far behind developed nations throughout the world in terms of allowing new parents paid, relaxing time to spend with their newborn children. SB 654 and SB 1166 aimed to extend these rights in California. SB 1166 would have required employers with at least 10 employees to allow them 12 weeks of parental leave. SB 654 was created after the failure of SB 1166; it increased the employee threshold to 20 and mandated 6 weeks of parental leave, but was ultimately vetoed by Governor Brown.

       

      (co-authors: Bonilla, Campos, C. Garcia, Gonzalez, Lopez)

    • YES

      SB 1263 (2016 - 2)

      Strengthens regulations to increase clean water access

      8.29.16

      (Wieckowski) Floor: 24-14-1

       

      Due to limited resources, small water companies often do not provide water that meets quality regulations. SB1263 bans these companies from operating if the proposed service area already has access to quality-tested and sustainable public water systems. This helps to ensure that all Californians have access to safe, clean water.

       

      (other lead author: Pavley)

    • NO

      SB 1318 (2016 - 1)

      Improves water and wastewater services for poor communities

      6.2.16

      (Wolk) Appropriations: 4-2-1
      (Wolk) Floor: 23-13-4

      Cities and districts in California are currently able to provide services to communities outside of their jurisdiction before taking care of the poor communities they oversee, even if the outside communities already have reliable options. SB1318 would have required cities and districts to provide water and wastewater services to all poor areas under their care before extending services elsewhere. It would have also required a review every five years to assess the availability of water and wastewater services in California counties. Finally, it would have mandated improvements in any areas found to be lacking.

    • N/E

      AB 1690 (2016 - 1)

      Strengthens job security for part-time community college professors

      6.22.16

      (Medina) Education: 5-2-2
      (Medina) Floor: 23-14-2

      Part-time faculty members in community colleges are usually paid per course and need to go through a rehiring process each term. This job insecurity affects a majority of community college professors, since part-time professors make up two-thirds of community college faculty. AB1690 – in conjunction with SB1379 – gives part-time professors the right to negotiate with their employers regarding rules of employment and termination, allowing them to work toward solutions that will give them more stable careers.

    • N/E

      AB 2748 (2016 - 1)

      Helps those affected by environmental disasters

      6.21.16

      (Gatto) Floor: 30-32-18
      (Gatto) Judiciary: 4-2-1

      The Aliso Canyon gas leak in October 2015 was the worst single gas leak in US history and directly affected thousands of families in northern Los Angeles County. AB2748 would have ensured that victims who win payouts in environmental disasters (for example, assistance with food and shelter) would not lose their rights to bring forth legal challenges in the future if more complications arose related to the disaster. AB2748 would have ensured that citizens have the opportunity to hold companies accountable for environmental disasters. It was vetoed by the Governor.

    • N/E

      SB 1053 (2016 - 1)

      Protects Section 8 renters from being denied housing

      3.29.16

      (Leno) Judiciary: 4-2-1

      Extremely high rent prices in California leave few housing opportunities for those living in poverty. However, with the help of Federal Housing Choice Vouchers (or “Section 8”), many families are able to afford rent in good, safe neighborhoods. Despite this assistance, landlords in California are legally permitted to deny housing for Section 8 recipients based on their Section 8 status. The Housing Opportunities Act (SB 1053) would have recategorized federal vouchers as protected income so that landlords would no longer have been able to reject tenants simply because they received government assistance.

    • NO

      SB 1150 (2016 - 1)

      Protects people from foreclosure after death of a family member

      4.20.16

      (Leno) Banking & Financial Institutions: 4-3-0

       

      After the passing of a family member, widows, widowers, and other heirs who fall behind on mortgage payments struggle to keep their homes. Mortgage servicers often refuse to work with them if they are not listed on the loan, which can lead to foreclosures for many families. SB1150 gives family members the same protections as their recently deceased loved ones — the right to modify loan payments, stop unlawful foreclosures, and sue for any violations. All told, SB1150 has given these families a fair chance to stay in their homes.

       

      (other lead author: Galgiani; co-author: Wieckowski)

    • N/E

      SB 1150 (2016 - 2)

      Protects people from foreclosure after death of a family member

      5.3.16

      (Leno) Judiciary: 4-1-2
      (Leno) Floor: 18-18-4

       

      After the passing of a family member, widows, widowers, and other heirs who fall behind on mortgage payments struggle to keep their homes. Mortgage servicers often refuse to work with them if they are not listed on the loan, which can lead to foreclosures for many families. SB1150 gives family members the same protections as their recently deceased loved ones — the right to modify loan payments, stop unlawful foreclosures, and sue for any violations. All told, SB1150 has given these families a fair chance to stay in their homes.

       

      (other lead author: Galgiani; co-author: Wieckowski)

    • N/E

      SB 1166 (2016 - 1)

      Increases length of parental leave

      4.19.16

      (Jackson) Judiciary: 4-2-1
      (Jackson) Floor: 22-14-4

       

      Although California is one of the few states to provide partial paid parental leave, we are still far behind developed nations throughout the world in terms of allowing new parents paid, relaxing time to spend with their newborn children. SB 654 and SB 1166 aimed to extend these rights in California. SB 1166 would have required employers with at least 10 employees to allow them 12 weeks of parental leave. SB 654 was created after the failure of SB 1166; it increased the employee threshold to 20 and mandated 6 weeks of parental leave, but was ultimately vetoed by Governor Brown.

       

      (co-authors: Bonilla, Campos, C. Garcia, Gonzalez, Lopez)

    • N/E

      SB 1234 (2016 - 1)

      Improves retirement plan options for private-sector workers

      4.11.16

      (de Leon) Public Employment & Retirement: 3-2-0

       

      With the looming inadequacy of Social Security and the lack of retirement options for many private-sector workers, SB1234 introduces a solution. All companies in California with at least five employees are now required to offer either their own retirement savings plan or the California Secure Choice Retirement Savings Program. The program creates a low-cost option for workers to have automatic deductions taken from their paychecks and put towards retirement. Since SB1234 focuses on workers who didn’t previously have retirement options, it fills a gap in long-term financial insecurity.

       

      (co-authors: Gatto, Beall, Dodd, C. Garcia, Gonzalez, Hall, Hertzberg, Leno, McCarty, Pan, Williams)

    • N/E

      SB 1263 (2016 - 1)

      Strengthens regulations to increase clean water access

      4.6.16

      (Wieckowski) Environmental Quality: 4-2-1
      (Wieckowski) Floor: 39-30-11

       

      Due to limited resources, small water companies often do not provide water that meets quality regulations. SB1263 bans these companies from operating if the proposed service area already has access to quality-tested and sustainable public water systems. This helps to ensure that all Californians have access to safe, clean water.

       

      (other lead author: Pavley)

    • N/E

      SB 1318 (2016 - 1)

      Improves water and wastewater services for poor communities

      5.23.16

      (Wolk) Appropriations: 4-2-1
      (Wolk) Floor: 23-13-4

      Cities and districts in California are currently able to provide services to communities outside of their jurisdiction before taking care of the poor communities they oversee, even if the outside communities already have reliable options. SB1318 would have required cities and districts to provide water and wastewater services to all poor areas under their care before extending services elsewhere. It would have also required a review every five years to assess the availability of water and wastewater services in California counties. Finally, it would have mandated improvements in any areas found to be lacking.

    • NO

      SB 1322 (2016 - 1)

      Decriminalizes prostitution for minors

      4.19.16

      (Mitchell) Public Safety: 4-3-0
      (Mitchell) Floor: 42-29-9

       

      Victims of sex trafficking are often treated as criminals by law enforcement. SB1322 helps to protect them by decriminalizing prostitution for minors. Under SB1322, law enforcement officials are permitted to take the children into temporary custody, but only if necessary for their safety. Each incident must be reported to a child welfare agency, and any person engaging in sex acts with minors will be arrested. But rather than punishing the children, SB1322 takes steps to ensure potential sex trafficking victims are shielded from unnecessary criminal histories.

       

      (co-authors: C. Garcia, Lackey, Wieckowski)

    • A
      =

      Chose not to cast a yes/no ballot

      N/E
      =

      Not Eligible to cast yes/no ballot due to committee assignments

      * Courage Campaign supported a position of NO on this vote.