calculating courage score
SHARE THIS SITE

STATE Assembly

(DISTRICT 30)
F

ANNA CABALLERO (D)

2017 COURAGE SCORE: 0
LIFETIME SCORE: 0

2017 HALL OF SHAME MEMBER

Anna Caballero made the Hall of Shame. The Hall of Shame includes the legislators most closely aligned with corporations and interest groups that exploit Californians. See all current Hall of Shame members here.

Download printable version

A few years back, Assemblymember Anna Caballero bragged to a reporter that it was “very difficult to align (her) to one party or the other.” She wasn’t kidding! Despite technically representing the Central Coast as a Democrat, Asm. Caballero has acted, and voted, more like a Republican. Even though her district consistently supports progressive ideals on statewide ballot initiatives, Asm. Caballero failed them on the most critical issues before the Assembly, earning her a spot in our Hall of Shame.

Given an opportunity to take a stand on behalf of low-income communities against megapolluters and the fossil fuel industry (AB378), Caballero folded, leaving her less-advantaged constituents in the Salinas Valley more vulnerable than ever. When she could have helped protect low-income Californians in urban areas, Caballero refused, casting a No vote that helped kill AB423, exposing thousands to continued sketchy landlord practices. Gun safety? Caballero voted against AB424, which would have made every school in California a gun-free zone, and against AB7, which would have expanded the list of areas where it is a crime to carry an unloaded long gun.

Caballero doesn’t just vote with corporate interests — she takes their money too. She’s raised hundreds of thousands of dollars from corporate interest groups, like for-profit charter schools, PG&E, and the pharmaceutical industry — companies that consistently put profits before people in California.

On bills to fix our broken, wasteful, racist criminal justice system, Caballero is no better. Given the chance to eliminate damaging, inhumane life-without-parole (LWOP) sentence for minors, Caballero voted No. Given the chance to grant judges more leeway in adding to already lengthy sentences, Caballero voted No to that one, too.

Caballero’s regressive values are all the more frustrating because she comes from a solidly progressive district! The voters Caballero represents are on record voting Yes to Prop 55, taxing the wealthy to fund our state’s education system, Yes to Prop 57, creating a more humane parole and juvenile bail system, Yes to Prop 59, overturning Citizens United and putting power back in the hands of the people, Yes to Prop 63, reducing gun violence by expanding background checks, and Yes to Prop 64, legalizing marijuana.

Does that sound like the kind of district best served by an Assemblymember who sides with big polluters, gun makers, and the prison-industrial complex?

In a different part of California, Asm. Anna Caballero’s constituents might agree with her voting record, but in her Central Coast district, she’s unquestionably out of step.

Contact her About 2017 Score

    There’s no other way to say it: you are part of the problem. It’s terrifying to watch someone like yourself use power and platform to protect corporations and interest groups that exploit Californians over constituents. Start demonstrating some courage, and represent the people you serve.

    NOTE: Although you may be disappointed with your representative, please be respectful. Use this opportunity to offer constructive feedback. Please abstain from negative, disparaging language, including, but not limited to: expletives, comments about race, gender identity, sexual orientation, ethnicity or religion, and anything specific to appearance.

    VOTING RECORD

    2017
    1005
    FILTER BY TOPIC
    ALL BILLS
    • ALL BILLS
    • Consumer Protection
    • Criminal Justice
    • Economic Justice
    • Education
    • Environmental Justice
    • Environmental Protection
    • Gender Equality
    • Gun Violence Prevention
    • Health
    • Housing
    • Immigration
    • LGBTQ Rights
    • Political Accountability
    • Racial Justice
    • Voting Rights
    • Workers' Rights
    • NO

      AB7

      Outlaws open carry in more public spaces

      4.20.17

      Floor: 44-29-7

       

      author: Gipson
      co-authors: Portantino, Wiener

       

      Over 33,000 Americans are killed each year by firearms, and the public display of weapons is increasingly used as an intimidation tactic, as it was during white supremacist, Neo-Nazi rallies in Charlottesville, Virginia. AB 7 expands the range of public places in which it is a crime to openly carry an unloaded long gun. (This bill is now law.)

    • NO

      AB7

      Outlaws open carry in more public spaces

      9.13.17

      Floor: 43-32-4

       

      author: Gipson
      co-authors: Portantino, Wiener

       

      Over 33,000 Americans are killed each year by firearms, and the public display of weapons is increasingly used as an intimidation tactic, as it was during white supremacist, Neo-Nazi rallies in Charlottesville, Virginia. AB 7 expands the range of public places in which it is a crime to openly carry an unloaded long gun. (This bill is now law.)

    • YES

      AB42

      Allows for more discretion in setting bail amounts

      6.1.17

      Floor: 35-37-8

       

      authors: Bonta, Bloom, Chiu, Jones-Sawyer, Quirk, M. Stone
      co-authors: Allen, Hertzberg, Mitchell, Wiener, Eggman, Friedman, Gloria

       

      California’s mandatory bail system is broken. By setting exorbitantly high dollar amounts which, if paid, allow someone accused of a crime to temporarily return to their life, the current bail system unfairly creates two standards of justice — one for the rich, and one for the poor. Further, studies repeatedly show that eliminating bail — allowing the accused to live normal lives while awaiting trial — does not increase crime. AB 42 would allow judges and law enforcement more discretion in setting bail amounts, taking a big step toward fixing this unfair and ineffective system. (This bill died.)

    • YES

      AB90

      Improves the CalGang database and protects individuals

      6.1.17

      Floor: 42-36-2

       

      author: Weber
      co-author: Mendoza

       

      CalGang is a database that holds information on over 150,000 individuals — mostly Latinos and blacks — who may or may not be connected to a gang in California. This system had many flaws, including not requiring law enforcement to notify those who had been added to the database. Transparency and accountability in the system has begun to increase, continuing with AB 90. New regulations will be put in place that will further secure privacy rights for all individuals — including immigrants whose information in the CalGang database can no longer be shared with ICE officials. There also must be stronger evidence of gang membership before individuals can be added to the CalGang database in the first place. (This bill is now law.)

    • YES

      AB90

      Improves the CalGang database and protects individuals

      9.14.17

      Floor: 42-32-5

       

      author: Weber
      co-author: Mendoza

       

      CalGang is a database that holds information on over 150,000 individuals — mostly Latinos and blacks — who may or may not be connected to a gang in California. This system had many flaws, including not requiring law enforcement to notify those who had been added to the database. Transparency and accountability in the system has begun to increase, continuing with AB 90. New regulations will be put in place that will further secure privacy rights for all individuals — including immigrants whose information in the CalGang database can no longer be shared with ICE officials. There also must be stronger evidence of gang membership before individuals can be added to the CalGang database in the first place. (This bill is now law.)

    • YES

      AB127

      Mandates the closure of Aliso Canyon gas facility

      5.18.17

      Floor: 45-25-10

       

      author: Assembly Budget Committee

      In 2015, a leak at the Aliso Canyon gas storage facility released more than 100,000 tons of methane into the air and forced thousands of people to evacuate their homes. AB 127 would respond to the calls of environmental champions and help prevent another disaster by mandating the closure of the Aliso Canyon facility by no later than 2028. (This bill died.)

    • YES

      AB186

      Creates safe injection sites for addicts

      6.1.17

      Floor: 41-33-6

       

      author: Eggman
      co-authors: Wiener, Friedman, Lara

       

      Two of the greatest risks facing victims of the current opioid crisis are drug users’ risk of overdose and their propensity to become isolated from society. Strategies that could reduce those two risk factors might take giant steps toward helping addicts and lessening the financial burden of opioid use on society. AB 186 would authorize local governments to create “safe injection sites” in select locations, incorporating users into society and lessening their chance of an overdose. (This bill was vetoed by Governor Brown.)

    • NO

      AB378

      Sets new pollution limits for cap and trade recipients

      6.1.17

      Floor: 35-39-6

       

      authors: C. Garcia, E. Garcia, Holden
      co-authors: Bloom, Bonta, Eggman, Friedman, Gomez, Jones-Sawyer, Kalra, McCarty, Reyes, Stone, Thurmond, Ting

       

      California’s ‘cap and trade’ policy often leaves low-income communities particularly vulnerable to pollution and environmental deterioration. AB 378 would require the state’s Air Resources Board to grade individual plants and to set new limits on air pollution as a condition for receiving some of the economic benefits of cap and trade. (This bill died.)

    • NO

      AB423

      Helps protect low-income Californians from eviction

      5.11.17

      Floor: 22-34-24

       

      author: Bonta

      As urban areas in California rapidly gentrify, low-income renters are often disenfranchised by both rising rents and shady landlord practices. One such practice — evicting low-income tenants from single room occupancy residences (in shared housing or in hotels) — is currently allowed in Oakland. AB 423 would no longer allow this, protecting thousands of low-income Californians from shady eviction practices. (This bill died.)

    • NO

      AB424

      Makes school zones truly gun free

      5.22.17

      Floor: 48-28-4

       

      authors: McCarty, Santiago
      co-authors: Chiu, Gloria

       

      Despite the numerous murders committed with guns on school and college campuses all across America, California law allowed certain permitted individuals to carry concealed firearms on to campuses. AB 424 will make schools truly “gun free” by not allowing anyone — even those with permits — on the property with a gun, keeping students and educators safer from gun violence. (This bill is now law.)

    • NO

      AB424

      Makes school zones truly gun free

      9.11.17

      Floor: 44-27-8

       

      authors: McCarty, Santiago
      co-authors: Chiu, Gloria

       

      Despite the numerous murders committed with guns on school and college campuses all across America, California law allowed certain permitted individuals to carry concealed firearms on to campuses. AB 424 will make schools truly “gun free” by not allowing anyone — even those with permits — on the property with a gun, keeping students and educators safer from gun violence. (This bill is now law.)

    • YES

      AB523

      Provides funds to cities most affected by pollution

      5.18.17

      Floor: 45-25-10

       

      author: Reyes
      co-author: Lara

       

      Each year, the California Energy Commission (CEC) administers $130 million through the Electric Program Investment Charge (EPIC) to invest in clean energy development in California, providing a benefit to our environment and helping lower costs for millions of energy users. AB 523 will dedicate a minimum of 25% of this annual money toward projects that exist in and benefit low-income communities who are the most vulnerable to pollution and its environmental and health concerns. (This bill is now law.)

    • NO

      AB859

      Helps provide justice for abused senior citizens

      6.1.17

      Floor: 43-17-20

       

      author: Eggman

      In 2016, 13% of elder care facilities in California were reported for exploitation, abuse, and neglect — twice as high as the national average of 5%. Hundreds of thousands of California’s elderly residents live in these care facilities. Previously, the burden of clear and convincing proof lied on the abused in these cases. AB 859 would have reduced that burden if it was found that the facility had destroyed evidence of abuse. (This bill was vetoed by Governor Brown.)

    • YES

      AB859

      Helps provide justice for abused senior citizens

      9.13.17

      Floor: 41-21-17

       

      author: Eggman

      In 2016, 13% of elder care facilities in California were reported for exploitation, abuse, and neglect — twice as high as the national average of 5%. Hundreds of thousands of California’s elderly residents live in these care facilities. Previously, the burden of clear and convincing proof lied on the abused in these cases. AB 859 would have reduced that burden if it was found that the facility had destroyed evidence of abuse. (This bill was vetoed by Governor Brown.)

    • NO

      AB890

      Mandates all new developments undergo environmental review

      6.1.17

      Floor: 44-32-4

       

      author: Medina
      co-author: Gonzalez Fletcher

       

      Housing developments that are approved by voters via ballot initiatives are allowed to skip the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) process. CEQA is a key step in evaluating the environmental impact of large construction projects. AB 890 would require developers to undergo full CEQA review and bans local governments from approving such projects outright. (This bill was vetoed by Governor Brown.)

    • YES

      AB890

      Mandates all new developments undergo environmental review

      9.13.17

      Floor: 45-30-4

       

      author: Medina
      co-author: Gonzalez Fletcher

       

      Housing developments that are approved by voters via ballot initiatives are allowed to skip the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) process. CEQA is a key step in evaluating the environmental impact of large construction projects. AB 890 would require developers to undergo full CEQA review and bans local governments from approving such projects outright. (This bill was vetoed by Governor Brown.)

    • NO

      AB1008

      Helps the formerly incarcerated gain employment

      6.1.17

      Floor: 41-33-6

       

      authors: McCarty, Gipson, Holden, Reyes, Weber
      co-author: Bradford

       

      In 2013, California passed a ‘Ban the Box’ law, forbidding most employers from asking job applicants about their criminal history as part of the initial job application process. AB 1008 strengthens the provisions of ‘Ban the Box’, forbidding all state and local agencies from inquiring about a criminal history until an employment offer has been made, and prohibiting employers from considering this information unless it directly affects the responsibilities of the job. AB 1008 will help more persons rehabilitate their lives after incarceration. (This bill is now law.)

    • YES

      AB1008

      Helps the formerly incarcerated gain employment

      9.15.17

      Floor: 42-30-7

       

      authors: McCarty, Gipson, Holden, Reyes, Weber
      co-author: Bradford

       

      In 2013, California passed a ‘Ban the Box’ law, forbidding most employers from asking job applicants about their criminal history as part of the initial job application process. AB 1008 strengthens the provisions of ‘Ban the Box’, forbidding all state and local agencies from inquiring about a criminal history until an employment offer has been made, and prohibiting employers from considering this information unless it directly affects the responsibilities of the job. AB 1008 will help more persons rehabilitate their lives after incarceration. (This bill is now law.)

    • NO

      AB1308

      Provides consideration of release for more young adults

      6.1.17

      Floor: 41-36-3

       

      author: Stone

      Current law in California requires the consideration of release for certain offenders whose crimes were committed when they were 23 or younger. AB 1308 will extend that mandate to offenders whose crimes were committed at age 25 or younger, giving more people who made mistakes in early adulthood the chance to rehabilitate themselves and return to society and their families. (This bill is now law.)

    • YES

      AB1505

      Requires new housing to have more affordable units

      5.4.17

      Floor: 47-24-9

       

      authors: Bloom, Chiu, Gloria
      co-authors: Bradford, Wiener, Allen, Gonzalez Fletcher, Mullin, Ting

       

      Housing costs throughout California have surged in recent years, with the median home now costing over $500,000. This unfettered market has increased homelessness and has created serious barriers in sustaining a healthy middle class. AB 1505 restores the authority of local government to require that new rental housing developments include 15% of units that are affordable to households earning 80% or less of the area’s median income. (This bill is now law.)

    • YES

      AB1505

      Requires new housing to have more affordable units

      9.15.17

      Floor: 46-27-6

       

      Floor: 23-12-5

       

      authors: Bloom, Chiu, Gloria
      co-authors: Bradford, Wiener, Allen, Gonzalez Fletcher, Mullin, Ting

       

      Housing costs throughout California have surged in recent years, with the median home now costing over $500,000. This unfettered market has increased homelessness and has created serious barriers in sustaining a healthy middle class. AB 1505 restores the authority of local government to require that new rental housing developments include 15% of units that are affordable to households earning 80% or less of the area’s median income. (This bill is now law.)

    • YES

      AB1565

      Provides overtime pay to more workers

      5.30.17

      Floor: 43-27-10

       

      author: Thurmond
      co-author: Gonzalez Fletcher

       

      Under current law, many California workers are not entitled to overtime compensation if their annual salary is greater than $23,660. In 2016, the Obama Administration issued new regulations, doubling that ceiling to include guaranteed overtime compensation for workers making less than $47,476. AB 1565 would protect low and mid-income workers by making that regulation part of California law. (This bill is now law.)

    • NO

      AB1578

      Protects legal cannabis users from federal agents

      6.1.17

      Floor: 41-33-6

       

      author: Jones-Sawyer
      co-authors: Bonta, Chiu, Eggman, C. Garcia, Skinner, Wiener, Wood

       

      Despite California’s legalization of cannabis, the Trump Administration recently threatened to use federal enforcement to continue treating medical cannabis or marijuana use as illegal. Californians have spoken on this issue, and AB 1578 would ensure that, absent a court order, local and state agencies will not assist federal agents in taking action against citizens who are operating legally under California law. This would help protect our citizens from unwelcome federal overreach and protects limited state and local resources from being used unlawfully. (This bill died.)

    • NO

      AB1668

      Better prepares cities and towns for drought

      5.31.17

      Floor: 44-25-11

       

      author: Friedman
      co-authors: Hertzberg, Skinner, Allen, Wiener

       

      California may be heading straight back into another drought after the previous one ravaged the state for years. AB 1668 would help California’s cities and towns better prepare for drought by providing them with the necessary support and resources they need to use water more efficiently. It will also save taxpayers money by better managing current water facilities before building new ones. (This bill is now law.)

    • A

      AJR24

      Rejects concealed carry permits from out-of-state holders

      9.12.17

      Floor: 47-28-4

       

      author: Santiago
      co-authors: Aguiar-Curry, Berman, Bloom, Bonta, Calderon, Chau, Chiu, Chu, Friedman, E. Garcia, Gipson, Gloria, Gonzalez Fletcher, Holden, Irwin, Jones-Sawyer, Kalra, Levine, Limon, Low, McCarty, Medina, Mullin, Muratsuchi, Nazarian, Quirk, Rendon, Reyes, Ridley-Thomas, Rodriquez, Rubio, Stone, Thurmond, Ting, Weber, Wood

       

      Over 30,000 Americans are killed each year by firearms. Despite the plague of gun-related deaths in our country, federal legislators have recently introduced bills that would require states to recognize concealed carry permits from out-of-state gun holders. AJR 24 will draw a firm line in the sand that California opposes such reciprocity, which would have eroded the common sense gun safety legislation our state has passed. (This bill is now law.)

    • YES

      SB33

      Gives consumers rights to go to court when fraud is committed

      9.5.17

      Floor: 46-23-10

       

      author: Dodd
      co-authors: Dababneh, Wieckowski, Chiu, Hertzberg

       

      In a massive case of corporate deceit, Wells Fargo was recently fined $185 million for the illegal creation of over 3 million fraudulent consumer accounts. On top of that, corporations like Wells Fargo often force consumers to sign documents promising to forgo their right to go to court when the business commits fraud against them. SB 33 safeguards consumers from this shady practice, particularly the most vulnerable among us — the elderly, working poor, immigrants grappling with a language barrier, and harried students just learning to balance a checkbook. (This bill is now law.)

    • A

      SB49

      Requires environmental standard enforcement despite federal rollbacks

      9.8.17

      Floor: 43-25-11

       

      authors: de Leon, Stern
      co-authors: Beall, Chiu, Dababneh, Friedman, Levine, McCarty, Skinner

       

      The Trump Administration has threatened to rollback or stop enforcing some of the federal regulations in the areas governing water, air, endangered species, and worker safety. SB 49 would require California state agencies to continue enforcing current standards if they are weakened by the President or Congress. (This bill died.)

    • YES

      SB54

      Makes California a sanctuary state for immigrants

      9.15.17

      Floor: 51-26-2

       

      author: de León

       

      co-authors: Atkins, Beall, Bonta, Chiu, Cooper, Gomez, Levine, Pan, Reyes, Santiago, Skinner, Wiener

       

      In recent months, deportations have surged throughout the country, creating a culture of fear that has resulted in the separation of families, the terrorization of undocumented workers, and division in communities. SB 54 makes California a sanctuary state — ensuring that state funds will not be used to tear apart families and that law enforcement does not participate in mass deportations. (This bill is now law.)

    • YES

      SB180

      Reforms War on Drugs-era sentence enhancements

      9.12.17

      Floor: 41-33-5

       

      authors: Mitchell, Lara
      co-authors: Bradford, Skinner, Wieckowski, Wiener

       

      One of the many legacies of the War on Drugs was that a person convicted of drug possession (or a similar offense) is sentenced to an additional three years for each prior conviction, leading to exorbitantly long jail sentences. The prosecution of these cases disproportionately impacts low-income communities of color, the homeless, and the mentally ill. SB 180 reforms the sentence enhancement to be based only on prior convictions involving the use of a minor as a seller or buyer. (This bill is now law.)

    • A

      SB298

      Protects those in debt from losing all their savings

      9.16.17

      Floor: 28-29-22

       

      author: Wieckowski

      Under current law, debt collectors can gain access to a debtor’s bank account and empty it entirely in order to recoup a debt balance, leaving no money for basic life necessities like food, rent, and prescriptions. SB 298 does not cancel any debts, but would mandate that creditors leave $4,800 in a debtor’s savings account, buying a little time for those on the verge of losing all their savings. (This bill died.)

    • YES

      SB306

      Allows workers to return to work during the labor claim process

      9.12.17

      Floor: 45-29-5

       

      author: Hertzberg
      co-author: Gonzalez Fletcher

       

      Previously, workers in California who filed a labor claim against their employers were not able to work while it was in process — a process that can take years. This places an unfair and heavy burden on workers. SB 306 provides those workers with the right to return to their jobs while the claim is being resolved. (This bill is now law.)

    • YES

      SB345

      Mandates that police publicly publish their policies

      9.13.17

      Floor: 47-29-3

       

      author: Bradford

      During recent years, when many unarmed citizens have been seriously injured or killed by police, public interest in police procedure and training has increased. With so many jurisdictions and departments all over California, transparency and accountability would increase dramatically if their policies and procedures were visible to the public. SB 345 would mandate that every law enforcement agency in the state publish on its website all “current standards, policies, practices, operating procedures, and education and training materials” by January 1, 2019. (This bill was vetoed by Governor Brown.)

    • NO

      SB394

      Eliminates life without parole sentences for minors

      9.15.17

      Floor: 44-30-5

       

      author: Lara, Mitchell
      co-authors: Bradford, Skinner, Wiener

       

      Nearly 300 Californians are currently serving mandatory life without parole (LWOP) sentences for crimes committed when they were minors. States all across the country are moving to eliminate LWOP sentences for minors under the belief that creating the opportunity for parole is a more humane, rehabilitation-focused approach to criminal justice. SB 394 will do just that in California, giving young people who have committed crimes the chance to rehabilitate their lives. (This bill is now law.)

    • YES

      SB395

      Allows minors to consult lawyers during all interrogations

      9.14.17

      Floor: 46-28-5

       

      author: Lara, Mitchell
      co-author: Skinner

       

      Developmental science concludes that cognitive brain development continues into adulthood, leaving minors with less capacity to understand their rights. Because of this, youth are significantly more vulnerable to giving false statements to authorities. SB 395 will safeguard young people’s rights by mandating that individuals 15 years or younger be permitted to consult with legal counsel prior to an interrogation. (This bill is now law.)

    • A

      SB464

      Enhances security measures to fight gun theft

      8.24.17

      Floor: 46-27-6

       

      author: Hill
      co-authors: McCarty, Wiener

       

      Over 33,000 Americans are killed each year by firearms, many of them stolen. SB 464 would increase the storage and security requirements of all firearms in the inventory of a licensed firearms dealer to help prevent theft. (This bill was vetoed by Governor Brown.)

    • A

      SB536

      Provides gun violence researchers with more accurate data

      9.5.17

      Floor: 48-23-8

       

      author: Pan
      co-author: Baker

       

      In 2014, California enacted a Gun Violence Restraining Order (GVRO) law, allowing law enforcement and family members to petition a court for a temporary firearm prohibition when a person is at risk of injury to self and others by accessing a firearm. These laws help prevent homicide and suicide, which contribute to the over 33,000 American deaths by guns each year. SB 536 allows certain researchers access to GVRO data, in order to better study the impacts of public policy on gun violence. (This bill is now law.)

    • A

      SB620

      Gives more options to judges in sentencings

      7.10.17

      Floor: 31-34-15

       

      author: Bradford

      In California, criminal sentences are often lengthened if the crime was committed with the use of a firearm. Judges often have little discretion due to mandatory sentence enhancements, and can sometimes be forced to levy unfairly long sentences on people who were not the ones carrying or using a firearm. SB 620 will grant judges more leeway to make determinations on sentence enhancements on a case-by-case basis, ensuring a more thoughtful, empowered approach to justice. (This bill is now law.)

    • NO

      SB620

      Gives more options to judges in sentencings

      9.12.17

      Floor: 42-33-4

       

      author: Bradford

      In California, criminal sentences are often lengthened if the crime was committed with the use of a firearm. Judges often have little discretion due to mandatory sentence enhancements, and can sometimes be forced to levy unfairly long sentences on people who were not the ones carrying or using a firearm. SB 620 will grant judges more leeway to make determinations on sentence enhancements on a case-by-case basis, ensuring a more thoughtful, empowered approach to justice. (This bill is now law.)

    • A

      SB687

      Safeguards against the closing of local hospitals

      9.14.17

      Floor: 36-28-15

       

      author: Skinner

      The further a person needs to go to obtain emergency medical care, the more likely they are to suffer or even die. The problem is being exacerbated as hospitals close as their owners search for greater profits. SB 687 would mandate that non-profit hospitals — which are often profit-driven despite their tax status — receive written approval from the state Attorney General before closing their general care or emergency departments, creating a more robust chain of accountability and an increased ability to block these closures. (This bill was vetoed by Governor Brown.)

    • YES

      SB687

      Safeguards against the closing of local hospitals

      9.15.17

      Floor: 46-26-7

       

      author: Skinner

      The further a person needs to go to obtain emergency medical care, the more likely they are to suffer or even die. The problem is being exacerbated as hospitals close as their owners search for greater profits. SB 687 would mandate that non-profit hospitals — which are often profit-driven despite their tax status — receive written approval from the state Attorney General before closing their general care or emergency departments, creating a more robust chain of accountability and an increased ability to block these closures. (This bill was vetoed by Governor Brown.)

    • YES

      SB774

      Increases accountability of Department of Toxic Substances

      9.8.17

      Floor: 46-27-6

       

      author: Leyva

      The Department of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC), the agency responsible for protecting Californians from the harmful effects of toxic substances, has struggled to earn the trust of communities of color, due to many cases of dubious oversight, like the Exide battery plant, Kettleman Hills hazardous waste facility, and Jordan Downs housing project. SB 774 would create a independent, 5-member board — the California Toxic Substances Board (CTSB) — to oversee the work of the DTSC, providing more accountability. (This bill was vetoed by Governor Brown.)

    • NO

      SCR48

      Allows for sentence delivery to be proportionate to the crime

      9.14.17

      Floor: 45-23-11

       

      author: Skinner
      co-author: Anderson

       

      The average California prison is currently 30% over capacity, leading to inhumane or poor living conditions. The prison population costs taxpayers an average of $70,836 per inmate, and many incarcerated individuals have not been sentenced fairly or equitably. SCR 48 gives judges and jurors more leeway to deliver a sentence that is appropriate for the crime committed, rather than requiring those who committed small crimes to serve unnecessarily long jail times. (This bill is now law.)

    • Sorry. We have no Voting Record for this topic yet.

    • A
      =

      Chose not to cast a yes/no ballot

      N/E
      =

      Not Eligible to cast yes/no ballot due to committee assignments