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STATE Assembly

(DISTRICT 49)
B

ED CHAU (D)

2018 COURAGE SCORE: 0
LIFETIME SCORE: 0

Contact him About his 2018 Score

    When it comes to standing up for your constituents over corporate lobbyists and interest groups that exploit Californians, you’re above average -- but I’d love to see you raise that Courage Score from a B to an A. Keep up the good work -- you’re so close to the top!

    NOTE: Although you may be disappointed with your representative, please be respectful. Use this opportunity to offer constructive feedback. Please abstain from negative, disparaging language, including, but not limited to: expletives, comments about race, gender identity, sexual orientation, ethnicity or religion, and anything specific to appearance.

    VOTING RECORD

    2018
    • 2017
    • 2016
    • 2015
    53
    FILTER BY TOPIC
    ALL BILLS
    • ALL BILLS
    • Consumer Protection
    • Criminal Justice
    • Economic Justice
    • Education
    • Environmental Justice
    • Environmental Protection
    • Gender Equality
    • Gun Violence Prevention
    • Health
    • Housing
    • Immigration
    • LGBTQ Rights
    • Political Accountability
    • Racial Justice
    • Voting Rights
    • Workers' Rights
    • YES

      AB1478

      Requires charter schools to get permission from local school districts to operate

      1.29.18

      Floor: 27-26-24

       

      Author: Jones-Sawyer

       

      Despite being institutions of public education, charter schools have operated with limited accountability. In an effort to increase accountability and coordination with local school districts, AB 1478 requires charter schools to seek approval from local school districts to open new campuses and renew existing agreements.

    • YES

      AB2119

      Ensures gender nonconforming youth have access to gender-affirming treatment

      5.21.18

      Floor: 46-22-10

       

      Author: Gloria
      Co-author: Wiener

       

      Child welfare agencies are required to assess the health needs of all young people in foster care, and to ensure they receive appropriate and timely care to address the needs identified by qualified professionals. This bill makes clear that, to meet this obligation for transgender and gender nonconforming youth, child welfare agencies must ensure access to clinicians who provide gender-affirming treatment consistent with established standards of care.

    • YES

      AB2888

      Expands the groups of people who can seek a firearm restraining order

      5.21.18

      Floor: 48-25-5

       

      Authors: Ting, Muratsuchi, Reyes
      Co-author: Allen

       

      Currently, family members and law enforcement may make a request to the court when they believe someone is a danger to themselves or others. If a judge agrees, that person must temporarily give up possession of their firearms and is banned from buying new ones, generally for 21 days. AB 2888 would add employers, coworkers, high school and college staff, and mental health workers to the list of individuals who can seek this type of restraining order.

    • YES

      AB1775

      Ends the transport of oil from offshore drilling facilities to the state

      5.30.18

      Floor: 45-24-9

       

      Author: Muratsuchi, Limón
      Co-author: Jackson

       

      The Trump administration has been actively attempting to increase offshore drilling efforts across the American coastline — including off California’s shores. AB 1775 and SB 834 would protect California’s coastline, environment, and economy by putting a stop to new offshore oil and gas drilling and production and making it nearly impossible to transport oil from offshore facilities.

    • YES

      AB2447

      Provides information to residents potentially impacted by pollution in their language

      5.30.18

      Floor: 47-26-5

       

      Author: Reyes
      Co-author: Lara

       

      Communities deserve the right to know when new pollution sources are proposed to be built in their neighborhoods. AB 2447 would protect environmentally vulnerable and economically disadvantaged communities from further degradation by mandating that land use notices be provided in the languages spoken by local residents.

    • YES

      AB2965

      Extends Medi-Cal benefits to low-income adults regardless of immigration status

      5.30.18

      Floor: 47-25-6

       

      Authors: Arambula, Thurmond
      Co-authors: Burke, Carrillo, Chiu, Friedman, Gonzalez, Wood

       

      Currently, undocumented Californians are not eligible for Medi-Cal, leaving thousands of residents uninsured and without adequate health care. AB 2965 and SB 974 would extend eligibility for full-scope Medi-Cal benefits to low-income adults ages 19-25 and 65 and over who are otherwise eligible, regardless of their immigration status.

    • YES

      AB3080

      Prohibits employers from requiring workers to sign forced arbitration agreements

      5.30.18

      Floor: 47-25-6

       

      Author: Gonzalez
      Co-authors: Jackson, Bonta, Carrillo, Friedman, Gloria, Kalra, Kamlager-Dove, Levine, McCarty, Muratsuchi, Reyes, Mark Stone, Weber, Leyva, Mitchell, Skinner

       

      Vulnerable workers are often subjected to workplace abuse and even coerced into signing agreements that force them to settle disputes out of courts of law, effectively stripping away a worker’s ability to fight against wage theft, sexual harassment, and other workers’ rights violations in court. AB 3080 would prohibit employers from requiring workers to sign forced arbitration agreements as a condition of employment, protecting vulnerable workers from coercion.

    • YES

      AB1793

      Creates a process to erase prior non-violent cannabis convictions

      5.31.18

      Floor: 43-28-7

       

      Author: Bonta
      Co-authors: Skinner, Wiener, Fletcher, Quirk

       

      Although the passage of Proposition 64 legalized recreational cannabis use and allowed for the “resentencing and destruction of records for prior convictions,” it did not specify a process for the retroactive erasure of non-violent cannabis convictions. AB 1793 mandates the California Department of Justice to search its database for eligible cases and send them to district attorneys for review by July 2019, potentially prompting the overturning of a plethora of wrongful convictions within the next few years.

    • YES

      AB2293

      Prohibits state boards from using nonviolent criminal records to deny professional licenses

      5.31.18

      Floor: 42-29-7

       

      Author: Reyes

       

      Securing employment is a crucial step in keeping people from going back to prison. However, about 30 percent of all jobs require professional licenses, which are usually granted by state boards. AB 2293 was part of a bill package that would have prohibited these boards from using arrest or conviction records as the only basis to deny professional licenses to applicants with nonviolent criminal arrests or convictions. It would have prohibited denial of Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) certification based on an individual’s criminal record. The bill was significantly amended to focus exclusively on mandating new reporting on EMT certification applicants including the demographic and criminal conviction history of applicants that were approved and denied certification.

    • YES

      AB2364

      Prevents landlords from needlessly evicting tenants

      5.31.18

      Floor: 25-36-17

       

      Authors: Bloom, Chiu

       

      The Ellis Act allows landlords to evict all tenants from a building, in order to go out of the rental business and use that building for another purpose. If an owner chooses to do so, they may not turn around after evicting the tenants and return their units to the rental market. However, the Act contains a loophole which allows landlords to do this unit-by-unit, thus allowing them to evict all their renters one by one and still remain in the rental business. AB 2364 would have closed this loophole.

    • YES

      AB2500

      Protects consumers from predatory lenders by capping interest rates

      5.31.18

      Floor: 27-30-21

       

      Author: Kalra
      Co- authors: Bradford, Mitchell, Bloom, Bonta, Chiu, Chu, Gonzalez, Jones-Sawyer, McCarty, Mark Stone, Ting

       

      Californians struggling with loans — often minorities, veterans, students, and seniors — end up falling deeper in debt due to penalty fees, debt collection lawsuits, damaged credit, and even bankruptcy. AB 2500 would have protected consumers from being targeted by predatory lenders by capping interest rates for loans at roughly 20% for consumer loans between $2,500 and $10,000.

    • YES

      AB3081

      Protects employees from being fired for being a victim of harassment

      5.31.18

      Floor: 47-23-8

       

      Authors: Gonzalez, Bonta

       

      Currently, California’s labor code prevents discrimination or retaliation against victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking. AB 3081 would also prohibit an employer from firing or otherwise discriminating or retaliating against an employee because of his or her status as a victim of sexual harassment, further expanding protections for victims of workplace harassment.

    • YES

      AB3131

      Requires law enforcement to notify the public when acquiring military equipment

      5.31.18

      Floor: 41-34-3

       

      Authors: Gloria, Chiu
      Co-author: Hill

       

      The increased militarization of local law enforcement has made of our neighborhoods feel like warzones. AB 3131 would restore transparency and accountability by making sure that law enforcement agencies provide notice to the public before they decide to acquire military equipment.

    • YES

      AB186

      Provides safe, government-run injection sites to prevent overdose and disease

      8.27.18

      Floor: 42-30-8

       

      Author: Talamantes Eggman
      Co-authors: Wiener, Friedman, Lara

       

      4,654 people died of drug overdoses in 2016 in California alone, according to the Center for Disease Control. AB 186 would authorize local governments to operate safe, hygienic, and secure injection sites for IV drug users and protect users and staff from prosecution. Permitting local governments to start these pilot programs would also prevent needless overdoses by managing dosages and prevent the transmission of HIV and Hepatitis B and C by assuring access to clean needles. Additionally, the sites would refer people to treatment and housing services.

    • YES

      SB1152

      Prohibits hospitals from discharging unhoused patients into unsafe conditions

      8.27.18

      Floor: 48-26-6

       

      Author: Hernandez
      Co-authors: Gloria, Mitchell

       

      Many hospitalized, unhoused people are often at risk of being discharged out into extreme weather or other unsafe conditions, making them even more vulnerable to worsened illness. SB 1152 would create a hospital discharge planning process for patients experiencing homelessness that takes into account the unique medical and social service needs of these individuals by mandating hospitals discharge homeless patients to a primary residence, health facility, or shelter facility that has agreed to accept them. SB 1152 would also require discharge planning for patients experiencing homelessness to ensure that the patient is clothed, has been offered screening for communicable disease, and has been offered enrollment assistance for affordable health care options.

    • YES

      SB1177

      Prohibits a person from purchasing more than one long gun per month

      8.27.18

      Floor: 47-30-3

       

      Author: Portantino

       

      Despite having some of the strongest gun safety legislation in the country, California still suffered from over 300 mass shootings in 2018. Currently, Californians are only permitted to purchase one handgun every 30 days. SB 1177 would prohibit a person from purchasing more than one long gun per month, aligning California law for both types of firearms.

    • YES

      SB834

      Ends the transport of oil from offshore drilling facilities to the state

      8.27.18

      Floor: 45-25-10

       

      Authors: Jackson, Lara
      Co-authors: McGuire, Muratsuchi, Allen, Bloom, Stern, Wiener

       

      The Trump administration has been actively attempting to increase offshore drilling efforts across the American coastline — including off California’s shores. SB 834 and AB 1775 would protect California’s coastline, environment, and economy by putting a stop to new offshore oil and gas drilling and production and making it nearly impossible to transport oil from offshore facilities.

    • YES

      SB100

      Sets a goal of 100% clean energy in California by 2045

      8.28.18

      Floor: 44-33-3

       

      Author: De León
      Co-authors: Allen, Beall, Berman, Bonta, Carrillo, Chiu, Dodd, Friedman, Gabriel, Gloria, Gonzalez, Irwin, Jackson, Kalra, Lara, Levine, Limón, McCarty, Monning, Muratsuchi, Pan, Quirk, Reyes, Rivas, Santiago, Skinner, Mark Stone, Thurmond, Ting, Wieckowski

       

      As the world’s fifth-largest economy and a global leader in environmental protections, California has the ability to move toward 100% clean energy. SB 100 acknowledges this and sets a goal for California to transition to 100% clean energy by 2045.

    • YES

      SB1100

      Raises the minimum age to purchase a long-gun to 21 years old

      8.28.18

      Floor: 47-30-3

       

      Author: Portantino
      Co-authors: Bonta, Gipson, Gonzalez, Wiener, Skinner

       

      Despite having some of the strongest gun safety legislation in the country, California still suffered from over 300 mass shootings in 2018. Existing law prohibits the sale or transfer of a handgun to anyone under 21 years old. SB 1100 raises the minimum age to purchase a long-gun to 21 years old, making both the law concerning handguns and long-guns consistent.

    • YES

      AB1775

      Ends the transport of oil from offshore drilling facilities to the state

      8.29.18

      Floor: 45-25-10

       

      Author: Muratsuchi, Limón
      Co-author: Jackson

       

      The Trump administration has been actively attempting to increase offshore drilling efforts across the American coastline — including off California’s shores. AB 1775 and SB 834 would protect California’s coastline, environment, and economy by putting a stop to new offshore oil and gas drilling and production and making it nearly impossible to transport oil from offshore facilities.

    • YES

      SB1437

      Protects people from being unfairly sentenced for murders they didn’t commit

      8.29.18

      Floor: 42-36-2

       

      Authors: Skinner, Anderson
      Co-authors: Gipson, Bonta, Burke, Medina, Wiener

       

      Current California law states that someone can be held criminally liable for murder if it occurs during a felony they committed, even if they were not present for the actual death. This results in hundreds of people being jailed for murders they didn’t commit. SB 1437 would ensure that a person can only be convicted of felony murder if they were directly involved with the crime and would reduce the number of people unfairly sentenced.

    • YES

      SB64

      Requires state agencies to identify ways to reduce air pollution

      8.29.18

      Floor: 33-37-10

       

      Author: Wieckowski

       

      While we need to bring more renewable energy onto our electric grid, we cannot allow the transition to clean energy to unjustly impose more burdens on communities already suffering from pollution that fossil fuel and natural gas production have caused. SB 64 would require state agencies to work together to collect data and identify ways to reduce air pollution, specifically prioritizing reducing emissions in communities most impacted by climate change.

    • YES

      AB2447

      Provides information to residents potentially impacted by pollution in their language

      8.30.18

      Floor: 42-30-8

       

      Author: Reyes
      Co-author: Lara

       

      Communities deserve the right to know when new pollution sources are proposed to be built in their neighborhoods. AB 2447 would protect environmentally vulnerable and economically disadvantaged communities from further degradation by mandating that land use notices be provided in the languages spoken by local residents.

    • YES

      AB3081

      Protects employees from being fired for being a victim of harassment

      8.30.18

      Floor: 47-25-8

       

      Authors: Gonzalez, Bonta

       

      Currently, California’s labor code prevents discrimination or retaliation against victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking. AB 3081 would also prohibit an employer from firing or otherwise discriminating or retaliating against an employee because of his or her status as a victim of sexual harassment, further expanding protections for victims of workplace harassment.

    • YES

      AB3131

      Requires law enforcement to notify the public when acquiring military equipment

      8.30.18

      Floor: 42-36-2

       

      Authors: Gloria, Chiu
      Co-author: Hill

       

      The increased militarization of local law enforcement has made of our neighborhoods feel like warzones. AB 3131 would restore transparency and accountability by making sure that law enforcement agencies provide notice to the public before they decide to acquire military equipment.

    • YES

      SB1300

      Strengthens employer obligations to prevent workplace harassment

      8.30.18

      Floor: 41-33-6

       

      Author: Jackson
      Co-author: Gonzalez

       

      Despite the progress made in recent years to combat cultures of harassment and abuse, workplace harassment remains a pervasive issue. SB 1300 amends existing state law to strengthen training requirements and other employer obligations to prevent workplace harassment, requires employers provide employees with information on how to file harassment complaints, and removes barriers to workers bringing claims and speaking out against harassment and abuse.

    • YES

      SB298

      Protects seasonal workers’ savings from debt collectors

      8.30.18

      Floor: 27-31-22

       

      Author: Wieckowski

       

      Currently, individuals such as farm laborers, substitute teachers, janitors, and others who work seasonally are at risk of losing their savings to creditors during the off-season. SB 298 would protect two months’ worth of savings at the amount of the hourly minimum wage from being taken by debt collectors so that seasonal workers are not left bankrupt.

    • A

      SB439

      Prevents children under 12 years old from being tried in juvenile court

      8.30.18

      Floor: 43-32-5

       

      Authors: Mitchell, Lara
      Co-author: Kamlager-Dove

       

      Currently, California lacks any law to prevent young children from being prosecuted as adults, leaving young children within the criminal justice system particularly vulnerable to prosecution and unfair convictions. SB 439 establishes 12 years as the minimum age for prosecution in juvenile court unless a minor younger than 12 has committed murder or rape.

    • A

      AB748

      Mandates that law enforcement publicly provide recordings of lethal force incidents

      8.31.18

      Floor: 41-32-7

       

      Author: Ting
      Co-authors: Carrillo, Jones-Sawyer

       

      AB 748 would mandate that, if requested, law enforcement agencies publicly provide audio and visual recordings of incidents in which lethal force was used. With so many jurisdictions and departments all over California, transparency and accountability would increase dramatically if body camera footage were made more available to the public.

    • YES

      SB1393

      Restores the court’s ability to decrease sentence enhancements for prior convictions

      8.31.18

      Floor: 41-33-6

       

      Authors: Mitchell, Lara
      Co-authors: Kalra, Beall, Bradford, Carrillo, Jones-Sawyer, Quirk, Skinner, Weber

       

      California’s severe sentence enhancements for prior convictions keeps inmates imprisoned for much longer than they should have to serve time. SB 1393 would restore the court’s discretion to slash the five-year sentence enhancements for prior serious felony convictions.

    • YES

      SB1421

      Provides public access to records regarding police misconduct

      8.31.18

      Floor: 44-30-6

       

      Author: Skinner
      Co-authors: Lara, Bradford, Glazer, Hill, Jones-Sawyer, McCarty, Mitchell, Moorlach, M. Stone, Weber, Wieckowski

       

      Police departments across the state have traditionally acted with little accountability and transparency, especially in cases of sexual assault, planting evidence and lying, and racist uses of lethal force. SB 1421 provides the public access to records regarding police misconduct, deadly and serious uses of force, and sexual assault.

    • YES

      SB244

      Protects personal data from being used to deport Californians

      8.31.18

      Floor: 48-26-6

       

      Author: Lara

       

      Californians’ personal data is often collected and stored by the state to help state agencies serve the public, but the data has also been used to aid mass deportations and religious registries. SB 244 would enhance privacy and confidentiality protections in state databases to ensure that personal data is only used to assess eligibility for and to provide public services. It would also prohibit disclosure of personal data from the California Department of Motor Vehicles database except in cases of warranted requests.

    • YES

      SB460

      Reinstates net neutrality in California

      8.31.18

      Floor: 28-37-15

       

      Authors: De León, Wiener
      Co-authors: Santiago, Bonta

       

      After the Trump administration moved to slash net neutrality’s protections for consumers, California legislators attempted to protect net neutrality with state legislation. SB 460 would reinstate net neutrality in CA and prohibit broadband providers from charging website access fees.

    • A

      AB1506

      Repeals the Costa-Hawkins ban on rent control

      1.11.18

      Committee: 3-2-2

       

      Authors: Bloom, Chiu, Bonta
      Co-author: Allen

       

      Currently, over 118,000 Californians are experiencing homelessness. AB 1506 would repeal the Costa-Hawkins ban on rent control to allow local authorities to decide for themselves whether or not to implement stronger rent control as part of their local strategy to fight homelessness and keep low-income and vulnerable families housed.

    • YES

      AB2731

      Ends tax reduction for hedge fund managers to fund public schools

      5.25.18

      Committee: 10-5-2

       

      Authors: Gipson, Bonta

       

      Each year, over a billion dollars in revenue is lost due to the lucrative and unfair carried interest loopholes, which allows a handful of hedge fund managers to lower their federal tax rates below those paid by regular working Americans. AB 2731 will close the carried interest loophole and generate revenue for public schools while helping minimize the impact of looming federal budget cuts.

    • YES

      SB64

      Requires state agencies to identify ways to reduce air pollution

      6.18.18

      Committee: 6-3-1

       

      Author: Wieckowski

       

      While we need to bring more renewable energy onto our electric grid, we cannot allow the transition to clean energy to unjustly impose more burdens on communities already suffering from pollution that fossil fuel and natural gas production have caused. SB 64 would require state agencies to work together to collect data and identify ways to reduce air pollution, specifically prioritizing reducing emissions in communities most impacted by climate change.

    • A

      SB1121

      Protects consumers’ medical data from cybersecurity breaches

      6.19.18

      Committee: 6-3-1

       

      Author: Dodd
      Co-authors: Chau, Hertzberg

       

      With increased concern for personal, private information, SB 1121 modernizes the Info Practices Act to align the original 1977 legislation with the Confidentiality of Medical Info Act by adding damages for failure to take reasonable security measures, thus discouraging privacy breaches and protecting consumers. By aligning the old legislation with current law, consumers’ medical records would be further protected from digital threats such as cybersecurity breaches.

    • A
      =

      Chose not to cast a yes/no ballot

      N/E
      =

      Not Eligible to cast yes/no ballot due to committee assignments