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STATE Senate

(DISTRICT 18)
A

BOB HERTZBERG (D)

2017 COURAGE SCORE: 0
LIFETIME SCORE: 0

Contact him About 2017 Score

    Outstanding! You rank in the highest among your peers when it comes to standing up for the needs of your constituents over corporations and interest groups that exploit Californians. Thank you for being a progressive champion of the people - California deserves more leaders like you!

    NOTE: Although you may be disappointed with your representative, please be respectful. Use this opportunity to offer constructive feedback. Please abstain from negative, disparaging language, including, but not limited to: expletives, comments about race, gender identity, sexual orientation, ethnicity or religion, and anything specific to appearance.

    VOTING RECORD

    2017
    • 2016
    • 2015
    124
    FILTER BY TOPIC
    ALL BILLS
    • ALL BILLS
    • Consumer Protection
    • Criminal Justice
    • Economic Justice
    • Education
    • Environmental Justice
    • Environmental Protection
    • Gender Equality
    • Gun Violence Prevention
    • Health
    • Housing
    • Immigration
    • LGBTQ Rights
    • Political Accountability
    • Racial Justice
    • Voting Rights
    • Workers' Rights
    • YES

      AB7

      Outlaws open carry in more public spaces

      9.12.17

      Floor: 24-14-2

       

      author: Gipson
      co-authors: Portantino, Wiener

       

      Over 33,000 Americans are killed each year by firearms, and the public display of weapons is increasingly used as an intimidation tactic, as it was during white supremacist, Neo-Nazi rallies in Charlottesville, Virginia. AB 7 expands the range of public places in which it is a crime to openly carry an unloaded long gun. (This bill is now law.)

    • YES

      AB186

      Creates safe injection sites for addicts

      9.12.17

      Floor: 19-17-4

       

      author: Eggman
      co-authors: Wiener, Friedman, Lara

       

      Two of the greatest risks facing victims of the current opioid crisis are drug users’ risk of overdose and their propensity to become isolated from society. Strategies that could reduce those two risk factors might take giant steps toward helping addicts and lessening the financial burden of opioid use on society. AB 186 would authorize local governments to create “safe injection sites” in select locations, incorporating users into society and lessening their chance of an overdose. (This bill is currently in the senate.)

    • YES

      AB859

      Helps provide justice for abused senior citizens

      9.6.17

      Floor: 23-12-5

       

      author: Eggman

      In 2016, 13% of elder care facilities in California were reported for exploitation, abuse, and neglect — twice as high as the national average of 5%. Hundreds of thousands of California’s elderly residents live in these care facilities. Previously, the burden of clear and convincing proof lied on the abused in these cases. AB 859 would have reduced that burden if it was found that the facility had destroyed evidence of abuse. (This bill was vetoed by Governor Brown.)

    • YES

      AB890

      Mandates all new developments undergo environmental review

      9.6.17

      Floor: 22-15-3

       

      author: Medina
      co-author: Gonzalez Fletcher

       

      Housing developments that are approved by voters via ballot initiatives are allowed to skip the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) process. CEQA is a key step in evaluating the environmental impact of large construction projects. AB 890 would require developers to undergo full CEQA review and bans local governments from approving such projects outright. (This bill was vetoed by Governor Brown.)

    • YES

      AB1308

      Provides consideration of release for more young adults

      9.12.17

      Floor: 23-14-3

       

      author: Stone

      Current law in California requires the consideration of release for certain offenders whose crimes were committed when they were 23 or younger. AB 1308 will extend that mandate to offenders whose crimes were committed at age 25 or younger, giving more people who made mistakes in early adulthood the chance to rehabilitate themselves and return to society and their families. (This bill is now law.)

    • A

      AB1397

      Creates more accurate inventory of land available for housing

      9.15.17

      Floor: 24-11-5

       

      author: Low
      co-authors: Bloom, Chiu, Wiener

       

      Current law requires every city and county to maintain an inventory of land suitable for low-income residential development, but does not require that the land actually be available for development. This discrepancy limits residential housing construction and further exacerbates the California housing crisis. To address this inefficiency, AB 1397 requires that land listed in the inventory be fully available for development, and have water, sewer, and other utilities sufficient to support a housing development. (This bill is now law.)

    • YES

      AB1461

      Requires meal subscription companies to meet health standards

      8.31.17

      Floor: 24-14-2

       

      author: Thurmond

      The recent rise of food delivery and subscription services has created public health concerns that employees working in these businesses aren’t being forced to meet the same health standards as those in more traditional restaurants. AB 1461 would require all employees at businesses that offer ‘meal subscription plans’ to obtain Food Handler Cards and take food preparation safety training. (This bill was vetoed by Governor Brown.)

    • YES

      AB1505

      Requires new housing to have more affordable units

      9.15.17

      Floor: 46-27-6

       

      Floor: 23-12-5

       

      authors: Bloom, Chiu, Gloria
      co-authors: Bradford, Wiener, Allen, Gonzalez Fletcher, Mullin, Ting

       

      Housing costs throughout California have surged in recent years, with the median home now costing over $500,000. This unfettered market has increased homelessness and has created serious barriers in sustaining a healthy middle class. AB 1505 restores the authority of local government to require that new rental housing developments include 15% of units that are affordable to households earning 80% or less of the area’s median income. (This bill is now law.)

    • YES

      SB30

      Bars CA from contracting companies that help build border wall

      6.1.17

      Floor: 23-16-1

       

      author: Lara

      The Trump administration has persistently pursued the erection of a border wall. Building this structure would be incredibly wasteful, in resources and federal dollars, and would do grave damage to families across the nation as well as the ecosystems in California and Texas. To deter participation in this misguided effort, SB 30 would prohibit the state from awarding or renewing any contract with any person who has provided goods or services to the federal government for the construction of the wall. (This bill is currently in the assembly.)

    • YES

      SB49

      Requires environmental standard enforcement despite federal rollbacks

      5.30.17

      Floor: 24-13-3

       

      authors: de Leon, Stern
      co-authors: Beall, Chiu, Dababneh, Friedman, Levine, McCarty, Skinner

       

      The Trump Administration has threatened to rollback or stop enforcing some of the federal regulations in the areas governing water, air, endangered species, and worker safety. SB 49 would require California state agencies to continue enforcing current standards if they are weakened by the President or Congress. (This bill is currently in the assembly.)

    • YES

      SB54

      Makes California a sanctuary state for immigrants

      4.3.17

      Floor: 27-12-1

       

      author: de León

       

      co-authors: Atkins, Beall, Bonta, Chiu, Cooper, Gomez, Levine, Pan, Reyes, Santiago, Skinner, Wiener

       

      In recent months, deportations have surged throughout the country, creating a culture of fear that has resulted in the separation of families, the terrorization of undocumented workers, and division in communities. SB 54 makes California a sanctuary state — ensuring that state funds will not be used to tear apart families and that law enforcement does not participate in mass deportations. (This bill is now law.)

    • YES

      SB54

      Makes California a sanctuary state for immigrants

      9.16.17

      Floor: 27-11-2

       

      author: de León

       

      co-authors: Atkins, Beall, Bonta, Chiu, Cooper, Gomez, Levine, Pan, Reyes, Santiago, Skinner, Wiener

       

      In recent months, deportations have surged throughout the country, creating a culture of fear that has resulted in the separation of families, the terrorization of undocumented workers, and division in communities. SB 54 makes California a sanctuary state — ensuring that state funds will not be used to tear apart families and that law enforcement does not participate in mass deportations. (This bill is now law.)

    • YES

      SB166

      Requires cities to provide housing sites for all income levels

      9.15.17

      Floor: 24-11-5

       

      author: Skinner
      co-author: Gloria

       

      Housing shortages have led to dramatically rising rents and aggressive gentrification all over California. SB 166 addresses the problem by ensuring that cities maintain an ongoing supply of identified sites for housing construction at each income level, which will help reduce housing costs and lower the rates of eviction and homelessness. (This bill is now law.)

    • YES

      SB180

      Reforms War on Drugs-era sentence enhancements

      5.15.17

      Floor: 22-13-5

       

      authors: Mitchell, Lara
      co-authors: Bradford, Skinner, Wieckowski, Wiener

       

      One of the many legacies of the War on Drugs was that a person convicted of drug possession (or a similar offense) is sentenced to an additional three years for each prior conviction, leading to exorbitantly long jail sentences. The prosecution of these cases disproportionately impacts low-income communities of color, the homeless, and the mentally ill. SB 180 reforms the sentence enhancement to be based only on prior convictions involving the use of a minor as a seller or buyer. (This bill is now law.)

    • YES

      SB239

      Eliminates criminalization of those with HIV

      9.11.17

      Floor: 24-12-4

       

      author: Wiener
      co-authors: Gloria, Atkins, Chiu, Eggman, Gipson, Mitchell, Skinner

       

      Several California laws target individuals living with HIV by criminalizing their sexual relationships. These laws further stigmatize individuals living with the disease and are not up-to-date with what we currently know about HIV. Enacting SB 239 eliminates one form of HIV discrimination by eliminating criminal punishment for people living with HIV who engage in consensual sexual activity. (This bill is now law.)

    • YES

      SB258

      Requires the disclosure of ingredients in cleaning products

      5.30.17

      Floor: 22-15-3

       

      author: Lara

      Unlike cosmetics or packaged food, no federal requirements exist for disclosing ingredients in cleaning products, even though some chemicals in these products have been found to cause cancer, birth defects, asthma, and other serious health risks. SB 258 requires known hazardous chemicals in these products to be listed on the label, as well as online, keeping consumers all over California safer. (This bill is now law.)

    • YES

      SB298

      Protects those in debt from losing all their savings

      5.22.17

      Floor: 22-12-6

       

      author: Wieckowski

      Under current law, debt collectors can gain access to a debtor’s bank account and empty it entirely in order to recoup a debt balance, leaving no money for basic life necessities like food, rent, and prescriptions. SB 298 does not cancel any debts, but would mandate that creditors leave $4,800 in a debtor’s savings account, buying a little time for those on the verge of losing all their savings. (This bill is currently in the assembly.)

    • YES

      SB345

      Mandates that police publicly publish their policies

      5.31.17

      Floor: 23-15-2

       

      author: Bradford

      During recent years, when many unarmed citizens have been seriously injured or killed by police, public interest in police procedure and training has increased. With so many jurisdictions and departments all over California, transparency and accountability would increase dramatically if their policies and procedures were visible to the public. SB 345 would mandate that every law enforcement agency in the state publish on its website all “current standards, policies, practices, operating procedures, and education and training materials” by January 1, 2019. (This bill is currently in the senate.)

    • YES

      SB439

      Sets age 12 as the minimum for criminal prosecution

      5.15.17

      Floor: 24-13-3

       

      authors: Mitchell, Lara

      In 2015, overzealous prosecutors attempted to bring criminal proceedings against nearly 1,000 children under the age of 12. Studies show that the immaturity of children makes it exceedingly difficult for them to navigate the criminal justice system, leaving them with negative long-term psychological impacts. SB 439 would follow the recommendation of the United Nations and set 12 as the age minimum for prosecution, promoting the well-being of children through alternative justice systems. (This bill is currently in the assembly.)

    • YES

      SB464

      Enhances security measures to fight gun theft

      9.5.17

      Floor: 24-14-2

       

      author: Hill
      co-authors: McCarty, Wiener

       

      Over 33,000 Americans are killed each year by firearms, many of them stolen. SB 464 would increase the storage and security requirements of all firearms in the inventory of a licensed firearms dealer to help prevent theft. (This bill is currently in the senate.)

    • YES

      SB538

      Reduces health care costs

      5.31.17

      Floor: 22-9-9

       

      author: Monning

      Service consolidations among multi-billion dollar hospital chains have contributed to skyrocketing health care costs in California and across the country. SB 538 would stop certain anti-competitive practices, many of which prevent employer groups from sharing pricing data that could encourage more cost-effective care for employees. (This bill is currently in the assembly.)

    • YES

      SB562

      Health care for all California residents

      6.1.17

      Floor: 23-14-3

       

      authors: Lara, Atkins
      co-authors: Bonta, Galgiani, Gomez, Wiener, Allen, Chiu, Friedman, Kalra, McCarty, McGuire, Nazarian, Skinner, Stone, Thurmond

       

      Despite moderate progress under the Affordable Care Act, our healthcare system remains deeply immoral and inefficient. Health care for ALL should be a human right. SB 562 would create a comprehensive universal single-payer health care coverage system for all California residents provided by the state. It would incorporate current federally mandated programs. (This bill is currently in the assembly.)

    • YES

      SB620

      Gives more options to judges in sentencings

      5.18.17

      Floor: 22-14-4

       

      author: Bradford

      In California, criminal sentences are often lengthened if the crime was committed with the use of a firearm. Judges often have little discretion due to mandatory sentence enhancements, and can sometimes be forced to levy unfairly long sentences on people who were not the ones carrying or using a firearm. SB 620 will grant judges more leeway to make determinations on sentence enhancements on a case-by-case basis, ensuring a more thoughtful, empowered approach to justice. (This bill is now law.)

    • YES

      SB620

      Gives more options to judges in sentencings

      9.13.17

      Floor: 22-13-5

       

      author: Bradford

      In California, criminal sentences are often lengthened if the crime was committed with the use of a firearm. Judges often have little discretion due to mandatory sentence enhancements, and can sometimes be forced to levy unfairly long sentences on people who were not the ones carrying or using a firearm. SB 620 will grant judges more leeway to make determinations on sentence enhancements on a case-by-case basis, ensuring a more thoughtful, empowered approach to justice. (This bill is now law.)

    • YES

      SB705

      Prohibits food vendors from using styrofoam

      5.31.17

      Floor: 15-19-6

       

      author: Allen
      co-authors: Hill, Stern

       

      Every year, state and local governments spend millions of dollars cleaning ‘styrofoam’ (polystyrene) from parks, beaches, and drains. Polystyrene collects by the ton in California waterways, and in the stomachs of animals who eat it. SB 705 would prohibit food vendors from using polystyrene take-out containers, helping to protect our environment for future generations. (This bill is currently in the senate.)

    • YES

      SB790

      Helps stop Big Pharma from paying off doctors

      5.18.17

      Floor: 23-13-4

       

      author: McGuire
      co-author: Monning

       

      Studies reveal that doctors who receive gifts from Big Pharma are up to three times as likely to prescribe costly name-brand drugs than the equivalent lower-priced generic drugs. SB 790 would ensure there are fewer financial incentives in place for doctors to serve Big Pharma instead of their patients, keeping the cost of health care lower for everyone. (This bill is currently in the assembly.)

    • YES

      AB1668

      Better prepares cities and towns for drought

      8.31.17

      Committee: 5-2-2

       

      author: Friedman
      co-authors: Hertzberg, Skinner, Allen, Wiener

       

      California may be heading straight back into another drought after the previous one ravaged the state for years. AB 1668 would help California’s cities and towns better prepare for drought by providing them with the necessary support and resources they need to use water more efficiently. It will also save taxpayers money by better managing current water facilities before building new ones. (This bill is now law.)

    • YES

      AB1701

      Allows workers to be paid while complaints are being handled

      7.18.17

      Committee: 4-2-1

       

      author: Thurmond
      co-author: Gonzalez Fletcher

       

      Current labor laws limit a worker’s legal actions when they have not been paid by their employer. This diminishes workers’ rights by establishing no penalty to employers for not compensating their workers while a complaint is being handled. Under AB 1701, workers who have not been paid for a job can seek their back wages and benefits, with interest, from either the direct contractor or the subcontractor, spreading accountability to all levels of the contracting structure. (This bill is now law.)

    • A

      SB63

      Gives more working parents paid family leave

      4.4.17

      Committee: 4-1-2

       

      author: Jackson
      co-authors: Atkins, Friedman, C. Garcia, Gonzalez Fletcher, Leyva, Limon, Reyes, Skinner, Chiu, Thurmond, Wiener

       

      Under previous California law, businesses with 50 or less employees were not required to provide parental leave. SB 63 supports working mothers and fathers by requiring employers with 20 or more employees to provide most employees up to 12 weeks of paid parental leave to bond with a new child within one year of the child’s birth, adoption, or foster care placement. (This bill is now law.)

    • A

      SB298

      Protects those in debt from losing all their savings

      5.2.17

      Committee: 4-2-1

       

      author: Wieckowski

      Under current law, debt collectors can gain access to a debtor’s bank account and empty it entirely in order to recoup a debt balance, leaving no money for basic life necessities like food, rent, and prescriptions. SB 298 does not cancel any debts, but would mandate that creditors leave $4,800 in a debtor’s savings account, buying a little time for those on the verge of losing all their savings. (This bill is currently in the assembly.)

    • A
      =

      Chose not to cast a yes/no ballot

      N/E
      =

      Not Eligible to cast yes/no ballot due to committee assignments