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TOM DALY (D)

STATE Assembly

(DISTRICT 69)
2019 COURAGE SCORE: 0
LIFETIME SCORE: 0
2019 COURAGE SCORE: 0
LIFETIME SCORE: 0

No legislator in Sacramento -- of either party -- is more out of step with their constituents.

Any conversation about disappointing, corporate-friendly Dems in Sacramento begins with Tom Daly.  We’re not going to mince words — Daly is an absolutely disastrous assemblymember. He not only supports regressive policies, but he does so while representing a district that is one of the more progressive ones in the state.

AD-69, which covers OC spots Anaheim, Garden Grove and Santa Ana, ranks 25th out of 80 in the state in support of progressive ballot measures. But you’d never know it from how Tom Daly votes. This year, he earned a pathetic Courage Score of 25 — in the bottom five Dems in the entire Assembly. No Hall of Shamer, past or present, is more out of step with his district than Tom Daly.

In 2018, the AD-69 gave resounding support (61%) to Prop 1, an initiative to support affordable housing for low-income folks, veterans, farmworkers and other groups. Daly’s district didn’t just like this idea, it loved it — supporting the measure at 5% higher than the state average. And what did Tom Daly do when given a chance to soften California’s housing crisis by building more affordable housing? He voted against protecting renters from exorbitant rent hikes and evictions without cause (AB1482), and didn’t bother to vote on a measure to raise money for Bay Area affordable housing (AB1487). He also missed a vote on SB329, which protects low-income applicants from being rejected based on their Section 8 status.

A district that sees creating more affordable housing as one solution to the state’s housing crisis — but a representative who either says no or no-shows when the topic comes up for a vote? No, thanks!

In case you’re just joining us, not voting (NVR) has the same effect on a bill’s chance to pass as voting NO does — they both mean one fewer vote of the 41 a bill needs to pass. And Tom Daly makes a lot of NVRs.

He NVRed on bills to protect California’s environment from Trump-era rollbacks (SB1) and leaking, abandoned oil wells (AB1328). He NVRed on strengthening public schools by giving local districts more control on charter school applications (AB1505), and ensuring voters get information on education-supporting taxes (AB268). He NVRed on protecting workers from bogus forced arbitration clauses (AB51) and no rehire provisions (AB749), which are unfair to workers who’ve been harassed on the job. 

One NVR — not even voting — after another. Daly’s non-votes are so repetitive (and annoying), they could be a song on a kid’s ride at Disneyland, which sits in his Anaheim District:

“NVR World, After All!”

“NVR World, After All!”

“NVR World, After All!”

Over and over again, Daly doesn’t show up on issues that matter. And when he does, he often votes with conservatives — like when taking the side of Wall Street over publicly financed banks (SB857) or denying the right of hospital patients to not be steered away from Medi-Cal, as crooked dialysis providers exploit the system to make billions (AB290).

Daly is a black eye on his district, which grows more progressive by the year. But let’s be honest — we don’t expect him to change. This is who he is. Way back in 1991, Daly was noted in the LA Times for receiving loads of lobbyist contributions on the Anaheim City Council. 30 years later, Daly still puts corporations before communities. AD-69 deserves better than Mr. Daly’s wild ride.

VOTING RECORD

2019
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51
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  • Workers' Rights
  • A

    AB749

    Prohibits "no rehire" provisions that bar victims of mistreatment from employment with offending company

    (5.2.19)

    Floor: 9-19-0

     

    Floor: 41-19-20

     

    Lead Authors: Mark Stone, Lorena Gonzalez, Reyes

    Summary: Many California employers settle threatened claims or lawsuits with agreements that includes a no re-hire provision, preventing the aggrieved employee from ever applying for a job within the company or its subsidiaries again. No re-hire provisions do nothing more than punish an employee who has been harmed. AB749 prohibits these provisions from being included in settlement agreements. This bill passed and was signed into law.

  • YES

    AB1215

    Bans (for 3 yrs) biometric surveillance and facial recognition from use in police body cameras

    (5.9.19)

    Floor: 45-17-18

     

    Lead Author: Ting

    Summary: Facial recognition technology is a nascent technology, both invasive and prone to systematic errors when used on women and people of color. As privacy concerns grow around personal privacy and our increasing surveillance state, AB1215 prohibits police departments across the state from using this harmful technology until 2023. This bill passed and has been signed into law.

  • A

    AB1505

    Empowers local districts to evaluate charter school applications based on economic impact criteria

    (5.22.19)

    Floor: 44-19-17

     

    Lead Authors: O’Donnell, Bonta, McCarty, Smith

    Summary: California has over a 1300 charter schools, many of which siphon resources from public education, disproportionately harming low-income families and accelerating the wealth gap. AB1505 would give local districts more power to evaluate charter applications based on the charter’s projected fiscal impact on the district as well as a potential school’s redundancy with other nearby charters. This bill passed and was signed into law.

  • A

    AB1600

    Expedites the process to obtain police misconduct records in a criminal trial

    (5.22.19)

    Floor: 45-27-8

     

    Lead Author: Kalra

    Summary: A defendant facing trial should have every opportunity to know if an officer involved in their case has any instances of documented police misconduct. AB1600 helps to expedite this process by shortening the notice requirement from 16 days to 10 days after the defendant has filed a motion to obtain these records. This bill passed and was signed into law.

  • NO

    AB290

    Prevents dialysis companies from steering patients from medi-cal to boost corporate profits

    (5.22.19)

    Floor: 46-15-19

     

    Lead Author: Wood

    Summary: The American Kidney Fund (AKF) is primarily funded by the two largest dialysis providers in the US — DaVita and Fresenius. AKF steers dialysis patients from Medi-Cal and toward private insurance, where the reimbursement rates they receive are much higher. This practice has helped enable these two companies to make profits exceeding four billion dollars since 2017. AB290 stops this heinous, price-gouging practice and will benefit both patients and taxpayers. This bill passed and was signed into law.

  • A

    AB51

    Prohibits employers from forcing job candidates to waive legal rights in favor of forced arbitration

    (5.22.19)

    Floor: 47-20-13

     

    Lead Author: Lorena Gonzalez

    Summary: Employers make common practice of forcing workers, as a condition of employment, to sign mandatory arbitration agreements — in effect, demanding they waive their full legal right to pursue damages in a potential dispute — to get a job. This practice is unethical and protects offending companies from being held fully accountable for causing injury — especially in cases made more visible through the #MeToo movement. AB51 ends the practice of forced arbitration and has been passed and signed into law.

  • A

    AB1328

    Strengthens emissions reporting requirements and transparency on environmental impact of abandoned wells

    (5.23.19)

    Floor: 47-24-9

     

    Lead Author: Holden

    Summary: Over 30,000 abandoned or idle oil and gas wells are scattered across California, and in many cases, nearby highly residential areas. A recent Los Angeles County report found many wells capable of leaking toxic chemicals, putting people and wildlife at risk. AB1328 requires two state agencies to study defunct wells to determine if greenhouse gases, volatile compounds, toxic contaminants and other pollutants are escaping into the air. This bill passed and has been signed into law.

  • A

    AB1360

    Strengthens food safety training requirements and mandates employer-provided insurance for delivery drivers

    (5.23.19)

    Floor: 44-25-11

     

    Lead Author: Ting

    Summary: One devastating component of what we call the gig economy — from driving to task apps — has been the lack of critical training and oversight apps like Uber and DoorDash provide their employees. AB1360 mandates that third-party food delivery platforms require employees to take food safety training and carry insurance for these drivers, protecting consumers, as well as the low-wage employees who do the work. This bill did not receive a floor vote in the Senate.

  • YES

    AB362

    Allows state to contract safe-injection site operators in the Bay Area

    (5.23.19)

    Floor: 44-26-10

     

    Lead Author: Eggman

    Summary: Safe-injection sites offer protected space and clean supplies for people to use drugs with assistance from trained medical staff. Far from enabling drug use, safe-injection sites have played a role in reducing overdose mentality and improving public health in Canada. AB362 would allow California to establish contracts with safe-injection site operators in the Bay Area. It has yet to be considered by the Senate.

  • NO

    AB403

    Lengthens statute of limitations for filing workplace retaliation claims from 6 months to 3 years

    (5.23.19)

    Floor: 42-27-11

     

    Lead Author: Kalra

    Summary: Workplace retaliation claims — where an employer takes adverse action against an employee as retaliation for exercising their rights under the Labor Code — increased by 22% in 2016, and immigration-specific retaliation claims increased by 90% in 2017. Immigrant workers are often afraid or unable to quickly come forward with a claim for a number of reasons. AB403 lengthens the statute of limitations for filing a claim from 6 months to 3 years. It passed, but was vetoed by the Governor.

  • A

    AB45

    Prohibits the state from charging inmates an administrative fee for a medical visit

    (5.23.19)

    Floor: 47-24-9

     

    Lead Authors: Mark Stone, Jones-Sawyer

    Summary: Incarcerated people enter prison with disproportionately high rates of poverty, then often forced to work manual labor for almost nothing. Charging inmates administrative fees (or co-pays) for medical visits is unnecessary and unfair. The barrier it creates to inmates receiving basic care exacerbates minor conditions and leads to the spread of infectious diseases. AB45 ends this practice. This bill passed and was signed into law.

  • A

    AB1487

    Creates Bay Area Housing Finance Authority, to raise and distribute affordable housing funds

    (5.24.19)

    Floor: 45-21-14

     

    Lead Author: Chiu

    Summary: Affordable housing is a priority concern all across our state, and no region has a bigger housing problem than the Bay Area. AB1487 creates the Bay Area Housing Finance Authority, which will raise and distribute funds for affordable housing and tenant protection. Unlike previous attempts at similar relief, the BAHFA will assess and meet challenges on a region, not just municipality level. This bill passed and was signed into law.

  • A

    AB936

    Strengthens transparency around nonfloating oil transport and creates contingency plans to prepare for spillage

    (5.24.19)

    Floor: 45-19-16

     

    Lead Author: Rivas

    Summary: Despite progress being made toward renewable energy by California environmental groups, the state is still deeply invested in oil refining — and the dangers of a spill of highly toxic ‘non-floating’ crude oil are vast. Past spills, like the Santa Barbara spill in 1969, have the potential to devastate both natural and human life. AB936 strengthens transparency around non-floating crude oil, forces into law a proper definition of this substance and requires the state energy commission to create contingency plans, in the event of a transportation accident. This bill passed and was signed into law.

  • YES

    AB965

    Allows people incarcerated as youth to earn time off their earliest parole date

    (5.24.19)

    Floor: 44-23-13

     

    Lead Author: Mark Stone

    Summary: Under current code, people are entitled to a hearing for early parole if they were less than 26 years old at the time of the controlling offense. However, the Department of Corrections holds a confusing, problematic definition of ‘initial hearing’ when measuring the time served of those incarcerated as youth. AB965 clarifies the definition and offers these folks the opportunity to earn credit toward earlier release dates, benefitting from the provisions of Prop 57 and having a smoother path toward rehabilitation and reintegration into society. This bill passed and was signed into law.

  • A

    AB1185

    Establishes civilian oversight of county sheriff departments

    (5.29.19)

    Floor: 43-23-14

     

    Lead Author: McCarty

    Summary: A 1994 court ruling established the right of counties to oversee Sheriff Departments. Across California, however, many overzealous Sheriffs continue to resist this essential check on their power — including a Sacramento Sheriff who blocked an Inspector General from coming to work after a reckless shooting performed by his office. AB1185 would codify the court ruling and affirm the right of counties to create oversight boards. It was not given a floor vote in the Senate.

  • YES

    AB1279

    Encourages affordable housing production in “high-resource” areas that show patterns of exclusion

    (5.29.19)

    Floor: 46-20-14

     

    Lead Author: Bloom

    Summary: A widespread lack of affordable housing is the most pressing issue facing California today. AB1279 would identify “high-resource” areas that show patterns of exclusion, encourage the production of affordable housing there — and prevent displacement where cheaper housing exists. It would force certain areas to accommodate people in desperate need of housing. It has yet to be considered by the Senate.

  • YES

    AB1366*

    Eliminates critical oversight of telecom companies

    (5.29.19)

    Floor: 64-6-10

     

    Authors: Daly, Obernolte

    Summary: In 2012, the legislature eliminated the authority of the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) – thinking that an unregulated market would produce more affordable, widely available broadband. It didn’t happen. Instead, as is most common, the lack of regulation created monopolistic conditions – and expensive, slow internet speeds throughout the state. Corporate providers like AT&T and Comcast would have loved to see such conditions continue, and tried to extend them via passage of AB1366. Internet and technology issues are complicated and, for a time, this complication obscuring these truly damning effects of the bill. Eventually, though, everyday people’s voices won out and the bill was pulled after wide protest.

  • NO

    AB1482

    Caps rent increase at 5% in 12-month period, and forces landlords to present 'just cause' before evicting

    (5.29.19)

    Floor: 43-31-6

     

    Lead Authors: Chiu, Bloom, Bonta, Grayson, Wicks

    Summary: The systemic lack of affordable housing in California grants landlords extraordinary power to gauge renters. Limiting rent increases creates stability, helps vulnerable Californians plan for their future and balances the playing field between renters and landlords. AB1482 will cap rent increases at 5% over 12-month periods, as well as force landlords to show “just cause” before evicting. This bill passed and was signed into law.

  • A

    AB901

    Decriminalizes truancy and limits power of probation departments over youths not charged with crimes

    (5.29.19)

    Floor: 42-27-11

     

    Lead Author: Gipson

    Summary: Current California law allows juvenile court judges to criminalize youth for truancy and other non-criminal offenses. This practice increases the chances that youth end up in a juvenile court and, therefore, the juvenile justice system. AB901 firmly decriminalizes truancy and forces counties to seek non-criminal alternatives, including referring juveniles to community based diversion programs before issuing a notice to appear in court. This bill did not receive a Floor vote in the Senate.

  • A

    AB1080

    Creates comprehensive plan to reduce waste by single-use packaging

    (5.30.19)

    Floor: 44-19-17

     

    Lead Authors: Lorena Gonzalez, Friedman, Calderon, Ting

    Summary: This decade will bring a 40% increase in plastic production and many cash-strapped governments are starting to send their plastics to landfills instead of recycling centers. California needs to lead on limiting plastic pollution. AB1080 would have required all single-use plastic packaging be reduced or recycled by 75% by 2030 while also requiring all single-use packaging to be recyclable or compostable after that point. It was not given a floor vote in the Senate.

  • A

    AB1611

    Requires insurance providers to charge same out-of-pocket costs for emergency care whether in plan or not

    (5.30.19)

    Floor: 48-9-23

     

    Lead Author: Chiu

    Summary: The practice of “balance billing” — forcing patients to pay surprise costs after they are treated, usually in an ER, by doctors who happen to be out of network — is yet another example of our broken healthcare system. AB1611 strikes down this practice, requiring providers charge the same out-of-pocket costs for emergency care whether the doctors who treated a patient are in the patient’s plan or not. This bill has yet to be considered by the Senate.

  • NO

    AB857

    Allows local governments to sponsor public banks

    (5.30.19)

    Floor: 41-29-10

     

    Lead Authors: Chiu, Santiago

    Summary: Nationally-owned banks dominate the financial marketplace, and time and again, invest resources in causes opposed to the values of Californians. Wall Street-backed banks often charge whatever exorbitant fees they can, enabled by their stranglehold on the market. AB857 allows local governments to sponsor public banks, which will be FDIC-insured, likely to charge lower fees and invest in locally-oriented resources while increasing competition in the marketplace. This bill passed and was signed into law.

  • YES

    ACA14

    Forces UC system to reduce contracted services in order to increase percent of union workers on their payroll

    (6.24.19)

    Floor: 57-12-10

     

    Lead Author: Lorena Gonzalez

    Summary: Current practice allows schools in the University of California system to subcontract out many staff positions, relieving them of the burden to offer certain benefits and protections a worker receives as part of a union. The UC system has displaced more than 7,000 of these jobs in recent years. ACA14 would force UC campuses to increase the percent of union workers on their payrolls. This proposed amendment fell 4 votes short in the Senate.

  • A

    ACA8

    Lowers voting age to 17

    (8.26.19)

    Floor: 57-16-0

     

    Lead Authors: Low, Gonzalez, Voepel

    Summary: Youth voters are chronically underrepresented in the voting population. At 17, many Californians are earning income on which they can be taxed, and facing life choices which can be severely affected by the decisions of elected officials. ACA8 lowers the minimum voting age to 17 years old in California. This proposed amendment has passed the Assembly but has not been considered by the Senate.

  • YES

    ACA6

    Restores voting rights for people on parole

    (9.5.19)

    Floor: 54-19-0

     

    Lead Authors: McCarty, Bonta, Carrillo, Gipson, Lorena Gonzalez, Kalra, Kamlager-Dove, Mullin, Mark Stone, Weber

    Summary: Over 50,000 Californians still on parole for past crimes are not allowed to vote. Not only is this practice wrong — a person who has served their time should have the same rights as anyone else — but it disproportionately impacts low income Californians and people of color. ACA6 would restore voting rights for people on parole. This proposed amendment passed the Assembly but was not considered by the Senate.

  • A

    AB749

    Prohibits "no rehire" provisions that bar victims of mistreatment from employment with offending company

    (9.5.19)

    Floor: 46-22-0

     

    Lead Authors: Mark Stone, Lorena Gonzalez, Reyes

    Summary: Many California employers settle threatened claims or lawsuits with agreements that includes a no re-hire provision, preventing the aggrieved employee from ever applying for a job within the company or its subsidiaries again. No re-hire provisions do nothing more than punish an employee who has been harmed. AB749 prohibits these provisions from being included in settlement agreements. This bill passed and was signed into law.

  • YES

    SB310

    Allows formerly incarcerated people to serve on juries

    (9.9.19)

    Floor: 47-26-0

     

    Lead Author: Skinner

    Summary: A person who has been incarcerated and released has served their debt to society, and should be granted equal rights to any citizen. Banning formerly incarcerated people from serving on juries disenfranchises them, while also disproportionately removes people of color — who are disproportionately incarcerated due to our flawed justice system — from the jury pool, perpetuating biased legal outcomes. SB310 reinstates the right of most formerly incarcerated people to serve on juries. This bill passed and was signed into law.

  • A

    SB268

    Offers voters more information on potentially progressive taxation measures

    (9.9.19)

    Floor: 45-25-0

     

    Lead Author: Wiener

    Summary: California makes it very difficult to generate revenues for essential services, often requiring two-thirds majority of voters to approve any tax hike. A recent law mandates ballots include descriptions of these proposals that do not exceed 75 words. However, this makes it nearly impossible to pass progressive-minded parcel taxes, which often contain multiple tiers that can not be detailed in 75 words. SB268 allows detailed information to be included in the official voter guide, which has more space, instead of the ballot itself. This bill passed but was vetoed by the Governor.

  • NO

    AB290

    Prevents dialysis companies from steering patients from medi-cal to boost corporate profits

    (9.10.19)

    Floor: 47-20-0

     

    Lead Author: Wood

    Summary: The American Kidney Fund (AKF) is primarily funded by the two largest dialysis providers in the US — DaVita and Fresenius. AKF steers dialysis patients from Medi-Cal and toward private insurance, where the reimbursement rates they receive are much higher. This practice has helped enable these two companies to make profits exceeding four billion dollars since 2017. AB290 stops this heinous, price-gouging practice and will benefit both patients and taxpayers. This bill passed and was signed into law.

  • YES

    AB965

    Allows people incarcerated as youth to earn time off their earliest parole date

    (9.10.19)

    Floor: 47-27-0

     

    Lead Author: Mark Stone

    Summary: Under current code, people are entitled to a hearing for early parole if they were less than 26 years old at the time of the controlling offense. However, the Department of Corrections holds a confusing, problematic definition of ‘initial hearing’ when measuring the time served of those incarcerated as youth. AB965 clarifies the definition and offers these folks the opportunity to earn credit toward earlier release dates, benefitting from the provisions of Prop 57 and having a smoother path toward rehabilitation and reintegration into society. This bill passed and was signed into law.

  • A

    SB329

    Prohibits landlords from rejecting applicants based on Section 8 status

    (9.10.19)

    Floor: 46-21-0

     

    Lead Author: Mitchell

    Summary: Landlords are legally prohibited from discriminating against a renter based on the source of their income — but not required to accept housing vouchers. This freedom to deny renters can limit the mobility of low-income people to move from poverty-concentrated areas. This law passed and was signed into law.

  • A

    SB616

    Forces debt collectors to leave final $1,724 in a bank account

    (9.10.19)

    Floor: 48-23-0

     

    Lead Author: Wieckowski

    Summary: Aggressive collection practices can wipe out families and send them into poverty instead of moving debt collection toward resolution. Allowing debt collectors to empty entire bank accounts is harmful and dangerous. SB616 forces debt collectors to leave the final $1,724 — the minimum amount a family of four needs to survive a month — in a debtor’s bank account, leaving them breathing room to work out repayment terms. This bill passed and was signed into law.

  • NO

    AB1482

    Caps rent increase at 5% in 12-month period, and forces landlords to present 'just cause' before evicting

    (9.11.19)

    Floor: 48-26-0

     

    Lead Authors: Chiu, Bloom, Bonta, Grayson, Wicks

    Summary: The systemic lack of affordable housing in California grants landlords extraordinary power to gauge renters. Limiting rent increases creates stability, helps vulnerable Californians plan for their future and balances the playing field between renters and landlords. AB1482 will cap rent increases at 5% over 12-month periods, as well as force landlords to show “just cause” before evicting. This bill passed and was signed into law.

  • A

    AB1600

    Expedites the process to obtain police misconduct records in a criminal trial

    (9.11.19)

    Floor: 42-28-0

     

    Lead Author: Kalra

    Summary: A defendant facing trial should have every opportunity to know if an officer involved in their case has any instances of documented police misconduct. AB1600 helps to expedite this process by shortening the notice requirement from 16 days to 10 days after the defendant has filed a motion to obtain these records. This bill passed and was signed into law.

  • YES

    AB1215

    Bans (for 3 yrs) biometric surveillance and facial recognition from use in police body cameras

    (9.12.19)

    Floor: 47-21-0

     

    Lead Author: Ting

    Summary: Facial recognition technology is a nascent technology, both invasive and prone to systematic errors when used on women and people of color. As privacy concerns grow around personal privacy and our increasing surveillance state, AB1215 prohibits police departments across the state from using this harmful technology until 2023. This bill passed and has been signed into law.

  • YES

    SB136

    Repeals sentencing enhancements for those with prior offenses

    (9.12.19)

    Floor: 41-37-0

     

    Lead Author: Wiener

    Summary: Incarcerating individuals costs California citizens $80,000 per individual year. Current law includes mandatory sentencing enhancements that add 1 year of incarceration for each past offense committed by the accused — a mandatory add-on that impacts a third of the incarcerated population. Significant research suggests these enhancements do not deter crime. SB 136 repeals these enhancements, ending this costly practice which leads to major inequities in the justice system. This bill passed and was signed into law.

  • A

    AB1487

    Creates Bay Area Housing Finance Authority, to raise and distribute affordable housing funds

    (9.12.19)

    Floor: 41-27-0

     

    Lead Author: Chiu

    Summary: Affordable housing is a priority concern all across our state, and no region has a bigger housing problem than the Bay Area. AB1487 creates the Bay Area Housing Finance Authority, which will raise and distribute funds for affordable housing and tenant protection. Unlike previous attempts at similar relief, the BAHFA will assess and meet challenges on a region, not just municipality level. This bill passed and was signed into law.

  • NO

    AB857

    Allows local governments to sponsor public banks

    (9.13.19)

    Floor: 42-29-0

     

    Lead Authors: Chiu, Santiago

    Summary: Nationally-owned banks dominate the financial marketplace, and time and again, invest resources in causes opposed to the values of Californians. Wall Street-backed banks often charge whatever exorbitant fees they can, enabled by their stranglehold on the market. AB857 allows local governments to sponsor public banks, which will be FDIC-insured, likely to charge lower fees and invest in locally-oriented resources while increasing competition in the marketplace. This bill passed and was signed into law.

  • A

    SB1

    Strengthens California environmental standards to pre-Trump federal levels

    (9.13.19)

    Floor: 26-14-0

     

    Floor: 48-22-0

     

    Lead Authors: Atkins, Portantino, Stern

    Summary: In just three years, the Trump administration has gutted many federal environmental regulations and attempted to roll back dramatic environmental progress made in California. SB 1 would override Trump-era concessions made to corporations and Big Ag, in order to protect California’s environment. SB 1 cements any rolled back environmental standards as state law, particularly as they apply to the Central Valley Project and the State Water Project. It passed but was vetoed by the Governor.

  • A

    SB218

    Establishes penalties for claims that arise under Fair Housing and Employment Act

    (9.14.19)

    Floor: 33-0-0

     

    Floor: 50-17-0

     

    Lead Author: Bradford

    Summary: SB218 allows local governments to better enforce anti-discrimination laws, to establish remedies and penalties for violations for claims that arise under FEHA — the Fair Housing and Employment Act. The bill passed, but was vetoed by the Governor.

  • YES

    AB1066

    Grants unemployment benefits for workers during first 3 weeks of a strike

    (4.24.19)

    Committee: 8-2-4

     

    Lead Author: Lorena Gonzalez

    Summary: Corporations have vastly more resources than individual workers, and often leverage those resources during a strike to “starve out” a workforce — negotiating slowly as workers worry their bank accounts will run dry. AB1066 grants workers an opportunity to collect unemployment benefits for the first three weeks of a strike, lending essential support to the bargaining power of labor. This bill failed by 2 votes in the Senate.

  • A
    =

    Chose not to cast a yes/no ballot

    N/E
    =

    Was not eligible to vote on this bill

    * Courage Campaign supported a NO vote on this bill

Contact Tom Daly

    You have failed the people of California, and I am incredibly disappointed that you consistently place corporate lobbyists and special interests above the well-being of everyday people. Your Courage Score is a reflection of your misguided priorities – I can only hope that you begin better reflecting the values of your constituents.

    NOTE: Although you may be disappointed with your representative, please be respectful. Use this opportunity to offer constructive feedback. Please abstain from negative, disparaging language, including, but not limited to: expletives, comments about race, gender identity, sexual orientation, ethnicity or religion, and anything specific to appearance.